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Export to pdf Uwe Sassnowski 03 May 13:00
  Export to pdf Kevin Cozens 03 May 16:05
  Export to pdf Jehan Pagès via gimp-user-list 07 May 12:49
   Export to pdf Dwain Alford via gimp-user-list 10 May 11:19
    Export to pdf Uwe Saßnowski 12 May 04:36
     Export to pdf Dwain Alford via gimp-user-list 12 May 21:26
Uwe Sassnowski
2019-05-03 13:00:21 UTC (4 months ago)

Export to pdf

Hello, 

I designed a brochure in gimp with several picture and text levels / layers. Then I combined all pictures and texts to one layer and exported it to pdf. I sent the pdf to the printing company for printing. The print was not in a perfect quality. The printing company told us that they normally get pdf's from their clients where they can make changes to improve the quality. I tried to export to pdf without combining all layers. But then all texts are changed in format. I can create pictures from the text layers. But then I and the printing company cannot go into the text anymore. Is there a way to export to pdf all single pictures and texts without combining all layers so that the printing company can touch all pictures and texts and to reach a higher quality print?

With best regards, Uwe

Kevin Cozens
2019-05-03 16:05:49 UTC (4 months ago)

Export to pdf

On 2019-05-03 9:00 a.m., Uwe Sassnowski wrote:

But then all texts are changed in format. I can create pictures from the text layers. But then I and the printing company cannot go into the text anymore.

If the single layer PDF you generated had the right look to text outputting a multi-layer version should not change the appearance of the text. You need to do an export to PDF from the original multi-layer XCF file on a machine that has the fonts installed which are referenced by the XCF file.

Cheers!

Kevin.

http://www.ve3syb.ca/               | "Nerds make the shiny things that
https://www.patreon.com/KevinCozens | distract the mouth-breathers, and
                                     | that's why we're powerful"
Owner of Elecraft K2 #2172          |
#include      |             --Chris Hardwick
Jehan Pagès via gimp-user-list
2019-05-07 12:49:27 UTC (4 months ago)

Export to pdf

Hi!

On Fri, May 3, 2019 at 10:07 PM Uwe Sassnowski wrote:

Hello,

I designed a brochure in gimp with several picture and text levels / layers. Then I combined all pictures and texts to one layer and exported it to pdf. I sent the pdf to the printing company for printing. The print was not in a perfect quality. The printing company told us that they normally get pdf's from their clients where they can make changes to improve the quality. I tried to export to pdf without combining all layers. But then all texts are changed in format. I can create pictures from the text layers. But then I and the printing company cannot go into the text anymore. Is there a way to export to pdf all single pictures and texts without combining all layers so that the printing company can touch all pictures and texts and to reach a higher quality print?

I can't remember if our implementation for PDF export rasterize text or not. In any case, if you want to lay out various items and similar activities common for printed objects, I would suggest to use Inkscape and/or Scribus. I mean: you can still use GIMP for obviously raster parts (drawing, photographs, etc.). But when it comes to complex designs, Inkscape may be the most appropriate tool. And if you have objects to set precisely on your page, Scribus may be better suited (it won't do that much more than what Inkscape does, simply it's rather *how* it does it which may make it much more straightforward when you think in term of print).

Now GIMP can also work very fine, even if you have texts. But then you have to understand well the printing process to provide a perfect raster object to the printshop and not expect them to edit it (we certainly don't want printshops to edit our designs in fact!).

Jehan

With best regards,
Uwe
_______________________________________________ gimp-user-list mailing list
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Dwain Alford via gimp-user-list
2019-05-10 11:19:29 UTC (3 months ago)

Export to pdf

john and uwe,
here, here. i agree whole-heartedly. gimp is a raster (pixel) based program while inkscape is a vector (number) based program which produces "smooth" outlines. scribus is a page layout program that handles the job of combining raster images, vector images and text into a neat package that a good print shop can execute a quality finished product of your design.

scribus exports directly to pdf and produces a cmyk file that is "print ready". design tools are just that, tools. would use a screw driver to try and pry a nail from a board? you would choose the appropriate tool for the job, correct? even though gimp can be used to design a page, inkscape is a better choice of the two. however, even though inkscape is a good program to use for page design, scribus is better. scribus will allow you to import text from an open document format (open office or libreoffice); it will also allow you to import a .svg (scaleable vector graphic) image or an adobe illustrator image. however, i have found that certain illy files after illustrator 9 will not import. but be not dismayed, illustrator will convert your image to the .svg format for importation.

for my work flow, i use a raster editor (gimp, photoshop, etc.) to size, color correct, etc. photographs; i use a vector editor (inkscape, illustrator, corel draw, etc.) to produce and size vector drawings and usually export to the .tif format (tif files contain more information than jpeg or png files - most commercial print shops prefer tif files for this reason); and i use a page layout program (scribus, indesign, quark express, etc.) to put the design elements together for the purpose of producing a print ready pdf file that produces a quality finished product.

i need to mention that "properly" sizing a raster image is most important. most commercial printers use a certain image resolution for different types of paper and the "use" of the image. for instance, a fine art print would be printed at 175 dpi while a newsprint image would be printed at 75-80 dpi. all this depends on the paper used for the job. i usually use 300 dpi for raster images and size the image according to the size i want to produce on the page. most vector images are either 300 or 600 dpi, depending on the program i use to produce them.

scribus will allow you to draw a container for an image and the program can size a large or small image to the container, but a 72 dpi image enlarged by this process will produce an ugly final image on the paper. there are some commercial printers that cannot print a scribus pdf file. since adobe is the "industry standard" software they calibrate their printers to adobe. small print shops use corel draw as their standard software. in this case, you can provide a native file with accompanying fonts in the file for printing. for most jobs where i use corel draw, i will convert text to curves so i don't have to provide fonts to the printer. and don't assume a printer knows how to print from a pdf. i have run across one that didn't understand that he didn't have to import my pdf into draw to print it. i guess he didn't know he could print from a pdf viewer to his chosen printer. but i digress. a page layout program is also a type setter. you can kern letters and paragraphs for "readability". i'm sure you have seen where some of your letters in a particular font will look closer together than other letters when printed. although raster and vector programs have the same capability, page layout programs do it better, because that's how they are designed.

color management is key to the whole process, but that's another conversation all together.

hope this helps.

On Tue, May 7, 2019 at 7:49 AM Jehan Pagès via gimp-user-list < gimp-user-list@gnome.org> wrote:

Hi!

On Fri, May 3, 2019 at 10:07 PM Uwe Sassnowski wrote:

Hello,

I designed a brochure in gimp with several picture and text levels / layers. Then I combined all pictures and texts to one layer and exported

it

to pdf. I sent the pdf to the printing company for printing. The print

was

not in a perfect quality. The printing company told us that they normally get pdf's from their clients where they can make changes to improve the quality. I tried to export to pdf without combining all layers. But then all texts are changed in format. I can create pictures from the text layers. But then I and the printing company cannot go into the text anymore. Is there a way to export to pdf all single pictures and texts without combining all layers so that the printing company can touch all pictures and texts and to reach a higher quality print?

I can't remember if our implementation for PDF export rasterize text or not. In any case, if you want to lay out various items and similar activities common for printed objects, I would suggest to use Inkscape and/or Scribus. I mean: you can still use GIMP for obviously raster parts (drawing, photographs, etc.). But when it comes to complex designs, Inkscape may be the most appropriate tool. And if you have objects to set precisely on your page, Scribus may be better suited (it won't do that much more than what Inkscape does, simply it's rather *how* it does it which may make it much more straightforward when you think in term of print).

Now GIMP can also work very fine, even if you have texts. But then you have to understand well the printing process to provide a perfect raster object to the printshop and not expect them to edit it (we certainly don't want printshops to edit our designs in fact!).

Jehan

With best regards,
Uwe
_______________________________________________ gimp-user-list mailing list
List address: gimp-user-list@gnome.org List membership: https://mail.gnome.org/mailman/listinfo/gimp-user-list List archives: https://mail.gnome.org/archives/gimp-user-list

--
ZeMarmot open animation film
http://film.zemarmot.net
Liberapay: https://liberapay.com/ZeMarmot/ Patreon: https://patreon.com/zemarmot Tipeee: https://www.tipeee.com/zemarmot _______________________________________________ gimp-user-list mailing list
List address: gimp-user-list@gnome.org List membership: https://mail.gnome.org/mailman/listinfo/gimp-user-list List archives: https://mail.gnome.org/archives/gimp-user-list

Uwe Saßnowski
2019-05-12 04:36:22 UTC (3 months ago)

Export to pdf

Hello Jehan and Dwain,

I thank you very much for your helpful answeres! All this makes realy sense. I now started to work with Scribus. To be honest I had some program crashes (I think because of my unknowingness in the first steps :)) and some color fields are difficult to design. But all in all it is easy to handle. You are right that this seems to be the correct program to make our print material. I made some test pdf's and it looks realy good. It will take some time to be on the same point where I was with gimp. I hope that our printer shop accept the pdf, but I have a good feeling, they are professional. I look forward to my first print. Thank you again! Nice to have such professional help!

With best regards, Uwe

Am 10.05.2019 um 13:19 schrieb Dwain Alford:

john and uwe,
here, here. i agree whole-heartedly. gimp is a raster (pixel) based program while inkscape is a vector (number) based program which produces "smooth" outlines. scribus is a page layout program that handles the job of combining raster images, vector images and text into a neat package that a good print shop can execute a quality finished product of your design.

scribus exports directly to pdf and produces a cmyk file that is "print ready". design tools are just that, tools. would use a screw driver to try and pry a nail from a board? you would choose the appropriate tool for the job, correct? even though gimp can be used to design a page, inkscape is a better choice of the two. however, even though inkscape is a good program to use for page design, scribus is better. scribus will allow you to import text from an open document format (open office or libreoffice); it will also allow you to import a .svg (scaleable vector graphic) image or an adobe illustrator image. however, i have found that certain illy files after illustrator 9 will not import. but be not dismayed, illustrator will convert your image to the .svg format for importation.

for my work flow, i use a raster editor (gimp, photoshop, etc.) to size, color correct, etc. photographs; i use a vector editor (inkscape, illustrator, corel draw, etc.) to produce and size vector drawings and usually export to the .tif format (tif files contain more information than jpeg or png files - most commercial print shops prefer tif files for this reason); and i use a page layout program (scribus, indesign, quark express, etc.) to put the design elements together for the purpose of producing a print ready pdf file that produces a quality finished product.

i need to mention that "properly" sizing a raster image is most important. most commercial printers use a certain image resolution for different types of paper and the "use" of the image. for instance, a fine art print would be printed at 175 dpi while a newsprint image would be printed at 75-80 dpi. all this depends on the paper used for the job. i usually use 300 dpi for raster images and size the image according to the size i want to produce on the page. most vector images are either 300 or 600 dpi, depending on the program i use to produce them.

scribus will allow you to draw a container for an image and the program can size a large or small image to the container, but a 72 dpi image enlarged by this process will produce an ugly final image on the paper. there are some commercial printers that cannot print a scribus pdf file. since adobe is the "industry standard" software they calibrate their printers to adobe. small print shops use corel draw as their standard software. in this case, you can provide a native file with accompanying fonts in the file for printing. for most jobs where i use corel draw, i will convert text to curves so i don't have to provide fonts to the printer. and don't assume a printer knows how to print from a pdf. i have run across one that didn't understand that he didn't have to import my pdf into draw to print it. i guess he didn't know he could print from a pdf viewer to his chosen printer. but i digress. a page layout program is also a type setter. you can kern letters and paragraphs for "readability". i'm sure you have seen where some of your letters in a particular font will look closer together than other letters when printed. although raster and vector programs have the same capability, page layout programs do it better, because that's how they are designed.

color management is key to the whole process, but that's another conversation all together.

hope this helps.

On Tue, May 7, 2019 at 7:49 AM Jehan Pagès via gimp-user-list > wrote:

Hi!

On Fri, May 3, 2019 at 10:07 PM Uwe Sassnowski > wrote:

> Hello,
>
> I designed a brochure in gimp with several picture and text levels / > layers. Then I combined all pictures and texts to one layer and exported it
> to pdf. I sent the pdf to the printing company for printing. The print was
> not in a perfect quality. The printing company told us that they normally
> get pdf's from their clients where they can make changes to improve the
> quality. I tried to export to pdf without combining all layers. But then
> all texts are changed in format. I can create pictures from the text > layers. But then I and the printing company cannot go into the text > anymore. Is there a way to export to pdf all single pictures and texts
> without combining all layers so that the printing company can touch all
> pictures and texts and to reach a higher quality print? >

I can't remember if our implementation for PDF export rasterize text or
not. In any case, if you want to lay out various items and similar activities common for printed objects, I would suggest to use Inkscape and/or Scribus. I mean: you can still use GIMP for obviously raster parts
(drawing, photographs, etc.). But when it comes to complex designs, Inkscape may be the most appropriate tool. And if you have objects to set
precisely on your page, Scribus may be better suited (it won't do that much
more than what Inkscape does, simply it's rather *how* it does it which may
make it much more straightforward when you think in term of print).

Now GIMP can also work very fine, even if you have texts. But then you have
to understand well the printing process to provide a perfect raster object
to the printshop and not expect them to edit it (we certainly don't want
printshops to edit our designs in fact!).

Jehan

> > With best regards,
> Uwe
> _______________________________________________ > gimp-user-list mailing list
> List address: gimp-user-list@gnome.org
> List membership:
https://mail.gnome.org/mailman/listinfo/gimp-user-list > List archives: https://mail.gnome.org/archives/gimp-user-list

-- ZeMarmot open animation film
http://film.zemarmot.net
Liberapay: https://liberapay.com/ZeMarmot/ Patreon: https://patreon.com/zemarmot Tipeee: https://www.tipeee.com/zemarmot _______________________________________________ gimp-user-list mailing list
List address: gimp-user-list@gnome.org
List membership:
https://mail.gnome.org/mailman/listinfo/gimp-user-list List archives: https://mail.gnome.org/archives/gimp-user-list

Dwain Alford via gimp-user-list
2019-05-12 21:26:08 UTC (3 months ago)

Export to pdf

uwe, et. al.,
one final thought. your commercial printer can help you work more proficiently with them, all you have to do is ask. be sure to subscribe to the scribus mailing list. there is an active community of users along with the developers ready to help resolve design problems with accurate how-to information, just like on this list.

best, dwain

On Sat, May 11, 2019 at 11:36 PM Uwe Saßnowski wrote:

Hello Jehan and Dwain,

I thank you very much for your helpful answeres! All this makes realy sense. I now started to work with Scribus. To be honest I had some program crashes (I think because of my unknowingness in the first steps :)) and some color fields are difficult to design. But all in all it is easy to handle. You are right that this seems to be the correct program to make our print material. I made some test pdf's and it looks realy good. It will take some time to be on the same point where I was with gimp. I hope that our printer shop accept the pdf, but I have a good feeling, they are professional. I look forward to my first print. Thank you again! Nice to have such professional help!

With best regards, Uwe
Am 10.05.2019 um 13:19 schrieb Dwain Alford:

john and uwe, here, here. i agree whole-heartedly. gimp is a raster (pixel) based program while inkscape is a vector (number) based program which produces "smooth" outlines. scribus is a page layout program that handles the job of combining raster images, vector images and text into a neat package that a good print shop can execute a quality finished product of your design.

scribus exports directly to pdf and produces a cmyk file that is "print ready". design tools are just that, tools. would use a screw driver to try and pry a nail from a board? you would choose the appropriate tool for the job, correct? even though gimp can be used to design a page, inkscape is a better choice of the two. however, even though inkscape is a good program to use for page design, scribus is better. scribus will allow you to import text from an open document format (open office or libreoffice); it will also allow you to import a .svg (scaleable vector graphic) image or an adobe illustrator image. however, i have found that certain illy files after illustrator 9 will not import. but be not dismayed, illustrator will convert your image to the .svg format for importation.

for my work flow, i use a raster editor (gimp, photoshop, etc.) to size, color correct, etc. photographs; i use a vector editor (inkscape, illustrator, corel draw, etc.) to produce and size vector drawings and usually export to the .tif format (tif files contain more information than jpeg or png files - most commercial print shops prefer tif files for this reason); and i use a page layout program (scribus, indesign, quark express, etc.) to put the design elements together for the purpose of producing a print ready pdf file that produces a quality finished product.

i need to mention that "properly" sizing a raster image is most important. most commercial printers use a certain image resolution for different types of paper and the "use" of the image. for instance, a fine art print would be printed at 175 dpi while a newsprint image would be printed at 75-80 dpi. all this depends on the paper used for the job. i usually use 300 dpi for raster images and size the image according to the size i want to produce on the page. most vector images are either 300 or 600 dpi, depending on the program i use to produce them.

scribus will allow you to draw a container for an image and the program can size a large or small image to the container, but a 72 dpi image enlarged by this process will produce an ugly final image on the paper. there are some commercial printers that cannot print a scribus pdf file. since adobe is the "industry standard" software they calibrate their printers to adobe. small print shops use corel draw as their standard software. in this case, you can provide a native file with accompanying fonts in the file for printing. for most jobs where i use corel draw, i will convert text to curves so i don't have to provide fonts to the printer. and don't assume a printer knows how to print from a pdf. i have run across one that didn't understand that he didn't have to import my pdf into draw to print it. i guess he didn't know he could print from a pdf viewer to his chosen printer. but i digress. a page layout program is also a type setter. you can kern letters and paragraphs for "readability". i'm sure you have seen where some of your letters in a particular font will look closer together than other letters when printed. although raster and vector programs have the same capability, page layout programs do it better, because that's how they are designed.

color management is key to the whole process, but that's another conversation all together.

hope this helps.

On Tue, May 7, 2019 at 7:49 AM Jehan Pagès via gimp-user-list < gimp-user-list@gnome.org> wrote:

Hi!

On Fri, May 3, 2019 at 10:07 PM Uwe Sassnowski wrote:

Hello,

I designed a brochure in gimp with several picture and text levels / layers. Then I combined all pictures and texts to one layer and

exported it

to pdf. I sent the pdf to the printing company for printing. The print

was

not in a perfect quality. The printing company told us that they

normally

get pdf's from their clients where they can make changes to improve the quality. I tried to export to pdf without combining all layers. But then all texts are changed in format. I can create pictures from the text layers. But then I and the printing company cannot go into the text anymore. Is there a way to export to pdf all single pictures and texts without combining all layers so that the printing company can touch all pictures and texts and to reach a higher quality print?

I can't remember if our implementation for PDF export rasterize text or not. In any case, if you want to lay out various items and similar activities common for printed objects, I would suggest to use Inkscape and/or Scribus. I mean: you can still use GIMP for obviously raster parts (drawing, photographs, etc.). But when it comes to complex designs, Inkscape may be the most appropriate tool. And if you have objects to set precisely on your page, Scribus may be better suited (it won't do that much
more than what Inkscape does, simply it's rather *how* it does it which may
make it much more straightforward when you think in term of print).

Now GIMP can also work very fine, even if you have texts. But then you have
to understand well the printing process to provide a perfect raster object to the printshop and not expect them to edit it (we certainly don't want printshops to edit our designs in fact!).

Jehan

With best regards,
Uwe
_______________________________________________ gimp-user-list mailing list
List address: gimp-user-list@gnome.org List membership: https://mail.gnome.org/mailman/listinfo/gimp-user-list List archives: https://mail.gnome.org/archives/gimp-user-list

--
ZeMarmot open animation film
http://film.zemarmot.net
Liberapay: https://liberapay.com/ZeMarmot/ Patreon: https://patreon.com/zemarmot Tipeee: https://www.tipeee.com/zemarmot _______________________________________________ gimp-user-list mailing list
List address: gimp-user-list@gnome.org List membership: https://mail.gnome.org/mailman/listinfo/gimp-user-list List archives: https://mail.gnome.org/archives/gimp-user-list