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Gimp-user Digest, Vol 7, Issue 15

This discussion is connected to the gimp-user-list.gnome.org mailing list which is provided by the GIMP developers and not related to gimpusers.com.

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20030408190017.B5A2B100CE@l... 07 Oct 20:15
  Gimp-user Digest, Vol 7, Issue 7 Michael J. Hammel 08 Apr 21:13
mjhammel@graphics-muse.org 07 Oct 20:15
  Gimp-user Digest, Vol 7, Issue 7 David Burren 09 Apr 02:25
20030416090043.596C410126@l... 07 Oct 20:15
  Gimp-user Digest, Vol 7, Issue 15 Michael J. Hammel 16 Apr 16:31
Michael J. Hammel
2003-04-08 21:13:46 UTC (over 17 years ago)

Gimp-user Digest, Vol 7, Issue 7

On Tue, 2003-04-08 at 14:00, jd wrote:

2. set default dpi to 300 ..so when i open jpegs they will be at 300dpi not 72...right?

No. The DPI default you set is for new images. JPEG images probably don't have a DPI set in them so they default to 72. You can change this after you open them by using Image->Scale and changing the DPI setting. Change the DPI first (even if it makes your image size get smaller) and accept the changes. Then go back into Image->Scale to resize the image at the new DPI. You can't scale the DPI *and* the image size at the same time.

I can't remember off hand if the JPEG format allows for DPI settings. If it does, it's possible the image has some DPI other than 72. But most JPEG's these days seem to come in Web ready format, which means 72 DPI.

NOTE: Web ready images *DO NOT* print well! 72 DPI is way to small for printing. You need at least 150DPI up to 300DPI, sometimes more (though I've not had to go higher yet).

3. save in tiff format

Uncompressed TIFF is easily accepted by most printers. If you compress it, there is the possibility that they won't be able to read it.

David Burren
2003-04-09 02:25:21 UTC (over 17 years ago)

Gimp-user Digest, Vol 7, Issue 7

On 08 Apr 2003 14:13:46 "EST", Michael J. Hammel wrote:

I can't remember off hand if the JPEG format allows for DPI settings. If it does, it's possible the image has some DPI other than 72. But most JPEG's these days seem to come in Web ready format, which means 72 DPI.

Indeed JPEGs use the same tags as defined in the TIFF spec for this. Although the value is fairly meaningless in this context, some digital cameras generate JPEGs with 180 dpi.

In the Gimp (and in Photoshop) when you save an image as a JPEG it saves the image's resolution with it. However Photoshop's "Save for Web" throws the resolution away and saves it at 72 dpi, and I've seen some people assume that JPEGs don't have a concept of resolution as a result. __
David

Michael J. Hammel
2003-04-16 16:31:29 UTC (over 17 years ago)

Gimp-user Digest, Vol 7, Issue 15

On Wed, 2003-04-16 at 04:00, John Culleton wrote:

So I ask the list: someone please provide me with a step by step download and install procedure. Please tell me exactly which zip files are needed and where they are. No more, no less. At this point assume that the LZW problem is not in play and the user doesn't have any emulators or whatever installed. The user just wants to download Gimp and start using it.=20

Some time back (last year) I pulled all the GIMP for Windows stuff I could find and packaged it up for easy installation. You can buy it on CD from my web site ($12 plus shipping) if you're interested.

http://www.graphics-muse.com/gfxmuse/gfxmuse.html

For what it's worth, my wife was opposed to GIMP vs Photoshop on Windows (she's not a Linux person) for a short time, until she learned her way around the UI. She now prefers GIMP for many tasks (she designs custom invitations: http://www.bluebugstudio.com/). The biggest problem Windows users have seems to be learning their way around the UI. I seldom hear feature complaints, except for CMYK issues.