Sign up now! · Forgot password?
RSS/Atom feed Twitter

Blending skin tones

This discussion is connected to the gimp-user-list.gnome.org mailing list which is provided by the GIMP developers and not related to gimpusers.com.

4 of 4 messages available
Toggle history

Please log in to manage your subscriptions.

Blending skin tones DacidBadada@netscape.net 26 Oct 04:33
  Blending skin tones Matthew H. Plough 26 Oct 05:28
   Blending skin tones jim feldman 26 Oct 18:17
    Blending skin tones MiollaM 20 Oct 20:01
DacidBadada@netscape.net
2004-10-26 04:33:02 UTC (about 17 years ago)

Blending skin tones

Hi-
Looking for some help touching up our wedding photos. Apparently, the makeup person used something she shouldn't have, so my wife's face is quite a few shades lighter than the rest of her.
I've read some of the manual and looked through a few tutorials, but I'm completely lost. If someone could point me in the right direction (in terms of a tuturioal or section of the manual), it would be a great help.
My wife's very upset, any help would be greatly appreciated!
Thanks!
Dave

___________________

Matthew H. Plough
2004-10-26 05:28:42 UTC (about 17 years ago)

Blending skin tones

DacidBadada@netscape.net wrote:

Hi-
Looking for some help touching up our wedding photos. Apparently, the makeup person used something she shouldn't have, so my wife's face is quite a few shades lighter than the rest of her.
I've read some of the manual and looked through a few tutorials, but I'm completely lost. If someone could point me in the right direction (in terms of a tuturioal or section of the manual), it would be a great help.

I can't really point you in the direction of a tutorial, but I can give you a few pointers. Depending on your level of experience, some of these may be obvious, but I'd rather give you more information than less.

First of all, make sure you save your modifications to copies of the originals! I do a lot with 3D graphics, so making bad changes to the original just involves re-rendering and waiting for a few minutes or hours depending on the level of detail and the size of the image, but in your case, messing up the original would be disastrous. Also, for best quality, save to .xcf, .png, or .tga while you're making changes. These formats are all lossless, so you won't get a quality degradation every time you save (which you would with .jpg).

Here is my suggestion on how to go about fixing your wife's makeup; it is based on the assumption that the makeup has desaturated her features:

(after duplicating the image and opening it up)

1) Save as a .xcf so you can save layers -- you can do this any time, but why not do it first?

2) Create a new layer in the Layer Manager. If the Layer Manager isn't open, head over to the Dialog menu > create new dock > layers, channels and paths

3) Select your new layer, and select the paint fuzzy brush strokes tool, and pick out a nice fuzzy brush that's big enough to make changes quickly, but small enough to do some degree of detail. You can move down to a smaller size at any time for more detailed work. Leave the brush type on normal mode since we'll be painting on the new layer. Now select a nice bright, saturated color -- a nice blue RGB = 0, 0, 255, might be nice. Paint over your wife's face with it. If she's blonde or has lighter hair, you'll have to be more careful not to get her hair

jim feldman
2004-10-26 18:17:54 UTC (about 17 years ago)

Blending skin tones

DacidBadada@netscape.net wrote:

Hi- Looking for some help touching up our wedding photos. Apparently, the makeup person used something she shouldn't have, so my wife's face is quite a few shades lighter than the rest of her. I've read some of the manual and looked through a few tutorials, but I'm completely lost. If someone could point me in the right direction (in terms of a tuturioal or section of the manual), it would be a great help.

I highly recommend this site
http://www.normankoren.com/makingfineprints.html . While not a gimp tutorial it covers the concepts that can be "mapped" to most of the photo manipulation suites. There are gimp tutorials and books out there to get you "gimped up"

This may be heresy on this list, but as a photographer I need to say it. Unless you intend to do a lot of photo-retouching (and given the importance of these photos), you may want to turn this over to a pro photo house that has people who do this full time. The point is that while it's not hard to get "ok" results, you'll spend a lot of time learning to get great results. Take a few passes at it, and if you're happy, fine. If not and you don't intend to make a hobby or business out of this, hand it over to a pro. High quality photo retouching is both a craft and an art, and can require the patience of Job.

Assuming you had this shot professionally, I'm surprised they didn't suggest this.

jim

2021-10-20 20:01:31 UTC (about 1 month ago)
postings
5
contact
Send private message

Blending skin tones

Skin care is very important, so it is worth paying attention to the use of patches. The best one can be found here https://olrom.com/products/eye-mask .