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Create web page?

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Create web page? RSA 26 Jan 04:46
  Create web page? Programmer In Training 26 Jan 04:55
   Create web page? PHPForm 25 Feb 17:50
BB564C7C10B0F64C90675B1BFED... 07 Oct 20:20
  Create web page? Greg Chapman 26 Jan 10:36
  Create web page? RSA 26 Jan 13:56
   Create web page? Programmer In Training 26 Jan 16:29
    Create web page? Deniz Dogan 26 Jan 17:56
     Create web page? bigskypa@gmail.com 26 Jan 18:42
      Create web page? Programmer In Training 26 Jan 19:09
      Create web page? Claus Cyrny 27 Jan 03:53
       Create web page? Frank Gore 27 Jan 03:55
       Create web page? Claus Cyrny 27 Jan 04:01
       Create web page? Nathan Lane 27 Jan 16:45
        Create web page? Deniz Dogan 27 Jan 17:00
         Create web page? Nathan Lane 27 Jan 17:05
          Create web page? Deniz Dogan 27 Jan 17:13
           Create web page? lorth 28 Jan 03:47
           Create web page? Nathan Lane 28 Jan 20:15
            Create web page? Paul Hartman 29 Jan 00:08
             Create web page? Deniz Dogan 29 Jan 00:19
              Create web page? Paul Hartman 29 Jan 00:54
               Create web page? Deniz Dogan 29 Jan 10:25
                [OT]Web Design [Was Re: Create web page?] Programmer In Training 29 Jan 13:46
          Create web page? Greg Chapman 27 Jan 19:19
          4B6107FF.7080603@yahoo.com Patrick Horgan 28 Jan 04:43
         Create web page? (correction) Claus Cyrny 27 Jan 21:28
          Create web page? (correction) Deniz Dogan 27 Jan 21:40
        Create web page? Claus Cyrny 27 Jan 21:20
     Create web page? Programmer In Training 26 Jan 19:07
      Create web page? Claus Cyrny 27 Jan 03:29
      Create web page? Claus Cyrny 27 Jan 03:43
     Create web page? Patrick Horgan 27 Jan 00:12
RSA
2010-01-26 04:46:25 UTC (about 14 years ago)

Create web page?

Can anyone recommend good tutorial for making a web page with GIMP?

Programmer In Training
2010-01-26 04:55:04 UTC (about 14 years ago)

Create web page?

On 1/25/2010 9:46 PM, RSA wrote:

Can anyone recommend good tutorial for making a web page with GIMP?

I recommend you don't. It might be good to use for general layout and such, but I recommend learning HTML and designing a site that way.

Greg Chapman
2010-01-26 10:36:56 UTC (about 14 years ago)

Create web page?

On 26 Jan 10 09:19 "Andre Anckaert" said:

Reading:
http://docs.gimp.org/2.6/en/introduction.html#introduction-gimp

I do not believe GIMP expects to be used for making WEB-pages. Nor for making coffee. It will certainly be glad to make images fit for use on the WEB.

A well known GIMP-tutor recently recommended "Kompozer" to me for building web-pages. See: http://www.gregtutor.plus.com

Thanks for the recommendation André. For English speakers there's also a lot of help available for KompoZer at the forum: http://wysifauthoring.informe.com/forum/

Greg Chapman http://www.gregtutor.plus.com
Helping new users of KompoZer and The GIMP

RSA
2010-01-26 13:56:06 UTC (about 14 years ago)

Create web page?

Just going by what I read on a "tutorial".

http://gimp-tutorials.net/websitetutorial

I use OpenOffice Writer and create web pages that way....it's much easier for a novice like myself than Kompozer and can do more with less html knowledge.

On 10-01-26 04:19 AM, Andre Anckaert wrote:

Reading:

http://docs.gimp.org/2.6/en/introduction.html#introduction-gimp

I do not believe GIMP expects to be used for making WEB-pages. Nor for making coffee. It will certainly be glad to make images fit for use on the WEB.

A well known GIMP-tutor recently recommended "Kompozer" to me for building web-pages. See: http://www.gregtutor.plus.com

André Anckaert

-----Oorspronkelijk bericht----- Van: gimp-user-bounces@lists.XCF.Berkeley.EDU [mailto:gimp-user-bounces@lists.XCF.Berkeley.EDU] Namens RSA Verzonden: dinsdag 26 januari 2010 4:46 Aan: gimp-user@lists.XCF.Berkeley.EDU Onderwerp: [Gimp-user] Create web page?

Can anyone recommend good tutorial for making a web page with GIMP?

Programmer In Training
2010-01-26 16:29:36 UTC (about 14 years ago)

Create web page?

On 1/26/2010 6:56 AM, RSA wrote:

Just going by what I read on a "tutorial".

http://gimp-tutorials.net/websitetutorial

I use OpenOffice Writer and create web pages that way....it's much easier for a novice like myself than Kompozer and can do more with less html knowledge.

I use a plain text editor. If you're going to be doing any sort of even half-serious web design, I highly recommend several methods of learning HTML:

Read the standard available at: www.w3.org

Go around to websites you like and view the source (it's how I learned to start out), then copy/paste the parts you like or want to learn more about. If you don't care about standards validity to start with, you only need to worry about the following structure:

Insert title

Insert content here

You seem to be an intelligent fellow. The above methods got me to designing nice looking sites in only about 6 months. Of course I've been brushing up my skills for the past 12 years now. I don't do anything overly-complex because I'm lazy and because it will break in at least one major browser. To get this back on subject, the only thing I use GIMP for in web design is image creation/editing.

Deniz Dogan
2010-01-26 17:56:17 UTC (about 14 years ago)

Create web page?

2010/1/26 Programmer In Training :

I use a plain text editor. If you're going to be doing any sort of even half-serious web design, I highly recommend several methods of learning HTML:

Read the standard available at: www.w3.org

It is not a good idea to just jump in and start reading standards and specifications. I suggest reading a good book about basic modern web design instead.

bigskypa@gmail.com
2010-01-26 18:42:56 UTC (about 14 years ago)

Create web page?

On 01/26/2010 11:56 AM, Deniz Dogan wrote:

2010/1/26 Programmer In Training:

I use a plain text editor. If you're going to be doing any sort of even half-serious web design, I highly recommend several methods of learning HTML:

Read the standard available at: www.w3.org

It is not a good idea to just jump in and start reading standards and specifications. I suggest reading a good book about basic modern web design instead.

I'm just a computer user with little or no interest in something other than making a simple web site. No flashy stuff (yet), just simple things. But, I do want the flexibility of making the page look the way I want it to look....in that, WYSIWYG is typically a misleading term....as the results are much different than what I hope for. In other words- it doesn't work out like that for me. And that's why books are written on "how to do it".

Programmer In Training
2010-01-26 19:07:38 UTC (about 14 years ago)

Create web page?

On 1/26/2010 10:56 AM, Deniz Dogan wrote:

2010/1/26 Programmer In Training :

I use a plain text editor. If you're going to be doing any sort of even half-serious web design, I highly recommend several methods of learning HTML:

Read the standard available at: www.w3.org

It is not a good idea to just jump in and start reading standards and specifications. I suggest reading a good book about basic modern web design instead.

I disagree. After teaching myself the basics (by copying work others had done), reading the standards and specifications jumped my knowledge more then any book ever did. The only design book I have is for CSS 2.1 and I don't even use it that much. It's not that it's a bad book (it's a great one, in fact), it's just that I find the specification to be much more user friendly in regards to search-ability.

Programmer In Training
2010-01-26 19:09:00 UTC (about 14 years ago)

Create web page?

On 1/26/2010 11:42 AM, bigskypa@gmail.com wrote:

I'm just a computer user with little or no interest in something other than making a simple web site. No flashy stuff (yet), just simple things. But, I do want the flexibility of making the page look the way I want it to look....in that, WYSIWYG is typically a misleading term....as the results are much different than what I hope for. In other words- it doesn't work out like that for me. And that's why books are written on "how to do it".

There are also online tuts. Again, I generally find them to be better than books because of being able to search for exactly what you need with minimal effort.

Patrick Horgan
2010-01-27 00:12:34 UTC (about 14 years ago)

Create web page?

Deniz Dogan wrote:

It is not a good idea to just jump in and start reading standards and specifications. I suggest reading a good book about basic modern web design instead.

Ah, different learning styles. Please understand that for some people, like me, for example this is exactly the perfect way. For others it wouldn't work at all. My only point is that it's good to realize that there are many learning styles and it's better not to make overarching statements about this will not work, or only this can be done. I agree that learning about design is good, but design books are so fluffy to me! I make myself read them, and I do better work because of it, but one is learning your tools, and the other is learning what might be better done with them.

Patrick

Claus Cyrny
2010-01-27 03:29:31 UTC (about 14 years ago)

Create web page?

Programmer In Training wrote:

On 1/26/2010 10:56 AM, Deniz Dogan wrote:

2010/1/26 Programmer In Training :

I use a plain text editor. If you're going to be doing any sort of even half-serious web design, I highly recommend several methods of learning HTML:

Read the standard available at: www.w3.org

It is not a good idea to just jump in and start reading standards and specifications. I suggest reading a good book about basic modern web design instead.

I disagree. After teaching myself the basics (by copying work others had done), reading the standards and specifications jumped my knowledge more then any book ever did. The only design book I have is for CSS 2.1

I'm also self-taught, and I learned much of what I know by having downloaded a really comprehensive reference that is written in German (unfortunately it's not available in English). Right now I'm at the point where I only use the W3C
specs I have downloaded as a reference. Essentially, I think, web design is not that difficult. Understanding the CSS box formatting model is imho very important, and when looking for the answer to any specific problem, I use Google.

Just my 2 cents,

Claus

Claus Cyrny
2010-01-27 03:43:28 UTC (about 14 years ago)

Create web page?

Programmer In Training wrote:

On 1/26/2010 10:56 AM, Deniz Dogan wrote:

2010/1/26 Programmer In Training :

I use a plain text editor.

I also write all of the code myself, but I would at least recommend a text editor which had syntax highlighting. Under Linux, this is really no problem, but I'm not sure about Windows or MacOS. I use Bluefish, a HTML/CSS editor for Linux.

Claus

Claus Cyrny
2010-01-27 03:53:40 UTC (about 14 years ago)

Create web page?

bigskypa@gmail.com wrote:

On 01/26/2010 11:56 AM, Deniz Dogan wrote:

2010/1/26 Programmer In Training:

I use a plain text editor. If you're going to be doing any sort of even half-serious web design, I highly recommend several methods of learning HTML:

Read the standard available at: www.w3.org

In the very beginning, I used this document as a reference:

http://www.lib.tsinghua.edu.cn/chinese/INTERNET/HTML/Table/html_design.html

Claus

Frank Gore
2010-01-27 03:55:57 UTC (about 14 years ago)

Create web page?

On Tue, Jan 26, 2010 at 9:53 PM, Claus Cyrny wrote:

In the very beginning, I used this document as a reference:

http://www.lib.tsinghua.edu.cn/chinese/INTERNET/HTML/Table/html_design.html

Oh wow, that brings back memories... you just made me feel real old.

Claus Cyrny
2010-01-27 04:01:49 UTC (about 14 years ago)

Create web page?

Claus Cyrny wrote:

bigskypa@gmail.com wrote:

On 01/26/2010 11:56 AM, Deniz Dogan wrote:

2010/1/26 Programmer In Training:

I use a plain text editor. If you're going to be doing any sort of even half-serious web design, I highly recommend several methods of learning HTML:

Read the standard available at: www.w3.org

In the very beginning, I used this document as a reference:

http://www.lib.tsinghua.edu.cn/chinese/INTERNET/HTML/Table/html_design.html

It is recommended, though, to enclose attributes properly, like

< img width="[value]", instead of < img width=[value].

Claus

Nathan Lane
2010-01-27 16:45:46 UTC (about 14 years ago)

Create web page?

Just adding my two cents. I just glanced at the TOC of that doc and noticed that a lot of it is out of date. Marquee and Font tags are no longer fully supported, and Framesets are a bad idea (although iframes for certain things are a good idea). Also never use tables to lay your website out. A lot of people still do, but I would not even consider it a poor-man's-layout, rather it is and always has been a terrible idea. Divs were invented specifically for layout of websites. Just a heads up. Tables are however good for displaying tabular data.

Just taking a glance around the web, I came across this, http://webdesign.about.com/od/tables/a/aa122605.htm, which goes over what to use tables for and what tabular data is. About.com is always a pretty good source for information, and I trust them on a lot of things. While they don't specialize in much of anything I would take a look.

http://www.W3Schools.com has the most up-to-date tutorials on HTML and CSS, which are the two technologies you need to learn to achieve the creation of a decent website, even if it is simple.

Nathan

On Tue, Jan 26, 2010 at 7:53 PM, Claus Cyrny wrote:

bigskypa@gmail.com wrote:

On 01/26/2010 11:56 AM, Deniz Dogan wrote:

2010/1/26 Programmer In Training :

I use a plain text editor. If you're going to be doing any sort of even half-serious web design, I highly recommend several methods of learning HTML:

Read the standard available at:www.w3.org

In the very beginning, I used this document as a reference:

http://www.lib.tsinghua.edu.cn/chinese/INTERNET/HTML/Table/html_design.html

Claus

-- Blog
Flickr

_______________________________________________ Gimp-user mailing list
Gimp-user@lists.XCF.Berkeley.EDU
https://lists.XCF.Berkeley.EDU/mailman/listinfo/gimp-user

Deniz Dogan
2010-01-27 17:00:33 UTC (about 14 years ago)

Create web page?

2010/1/27 Nathan Lane :

http://www.W3Schools.com has the most up-to-date tutorials on HTML and CSS, which are the two technologies you need to learn to achieve the creation of a decent website, even if it is simple. Nathan

Lots of professional web developers ridicule W3 Schools often, but it's a good place to find quick (and dirty) information.

Nathan Lane
2010-01-27 17:05:09 UTC (about 14 years ago)

Create web page?

I have not hear that. Why would "professional developers" ridicule the body of computer scientists who work hard to make it possible for them to develop more easily. W3C is the only reason that HTML works on every browser on every operating system. It's the reason we have CSS. Without the W3C JavaScript would still be useless. They also develop the standards for the Internet in general. It's too bad that some developers ridicule they very root reason they have a job or a hobby. W3Schools is a W3C website.

On Wed, Jan 27, 2010 at 9:00 AM, Deniz Dogan wrote:

2010/1/27 Nathan Lane :

http://www.W3Schools.com has the most up-to-date tutorials on HTML and

CSS,

which are the two technologies you need to learn to achieve the creation

of

a decent website, even if it is simple. Nathan

Lots of professional web developers ridicule W3 Schools often, but it's a good place to find quick (and dirty) information.

-- Deniz Dogan

Deniz Dogan
2010-01-27 17:13:35 UTC (about 14 years ago)

Create web page?

2010/1/27 Nathan Lane :

I have not hear that. Why would "professional developers" ridicule the body of computer scientists who work hard to make it possible for them to develop more easily. W3C is the only reason that HTML works on every browser on every operating system. It's the reason we have CSS. Without the W3C JavaScript would still be useless. They also develop the standards for the Internet in general. It's too bad that some developers ridicule they very root reason they have a job or a hobby. W3Schools is a W3C website.

I'm not saying *W3C* is a bad thing and I'd doubt any serious web developer would say that either. All I'm saying is that the impression I've gotten from working with other web developers (in real life and on the Internet) is that W3 Schools is silly. I don't know why.

W3 Schools is not associated with W3C as far as I know. Why would W3C have lots of ads and banners on any of their websites?

Greg Chapman
2010-01-27 19:19:12 UTC (about 14 years ago)

Create web page?

Hi Nathan,

On 27 Jan 10 16:05 Nathan Lane said:

W3Schools is a W3C website.

I cannot see any evidence that the company Refsnes Data, which owns w3schools.com is related to the W3C.

Greg Chapman http://www.gregtutor.plus.com
Helping new users of KompoZer and The GIMP

Claus Cyrny
2010-01-27 21:20:32 UTC (about 14 years ago)

Create web page?

Nathan Lane wrote:

... Marquee and Font tags are no longer fully supported, and Framesets are a bad idea

I absolutely second that! ;-)

(although iframes for certain things are a good idea). Also never use tables to lay your website out. A lot of people still do, but I would not even consider it a poor-man's-layout, rather it is and always has been a terrible idea. Divs were invented specifically for layout of websites. Just a heads up. Tables are however good for displaying tabular data.

Yep! I strictly separate markup (XHTML) & layout (CSS), and this really gives
one great freedom.

> RSA

The following is really absolutely essential (simple, as it may seem):

http://www.w3schools.com/css/css_boxmodel.asp

This model is valid for just about any (X)HTML element. (XHTML is just HTML 4.01 with
a few restrictions, in order to make it XML compliant.)

A recommendable resource is the HTML Writers Guild at http://www.hwg.org/. Those are really nice folks (as on this list ;-).

Just taking a glance around the web, I came across this, http://webdesign.about.com/od/tables/a/aa122605.htm, which goes over what to use tables for and what tabular data is. About.com is always a pretty good source for information, and I trust them on a lot of things. While they don't specialize in much of anything I would take a look.

http://www.W3Schools.com has the most up-to-date tutorials on HTML and CSS, which are the two technologies you need to learn to achieve the creation of a decent website, even if it is simple.

Adfter taking a brief glance, at least I fail to understand this.

Claus

Nathan

On Tue, Jan 26, 2010 at 7:53 PM, Claus Cyrny > wrote:

bigskypa@gmail.com wrote:

On 01/26/2010 11:56 AM, Deniz Dogan wrote:

2010/1/26 Programmer In Training :

I use a plain text editor. If you're going to be doing any sort of even half-serious web design, I highly recommend several methods of learning HTML:

Read the standard available at: www.w3.org

In the very beginning, I used this document as a reference:

http://www.lib.tsinghua.edu.cn/chinese/INTERNET/HTML/Table/html_design.html

Claus

Claus Cyrny
2010-01-27 21:28:13 UTC (about 14 years ago)

Create web page? (correction)

Deniz Dogan wrote:

2010/1/27 Nathan Lane :

http://www.W3Schools.com has the most up-to-date tutorials on HTML and CSS, which are the two technologies you need to learn to achieve the creation of a decent website, even if it is simple. Nathan

My "At least I fail to understand that" was actually supposed to be a comment on the following:

Lots of professional web developers ridicule W3 Schools often, but it's a good place to find quick (and dirty) information.

Claus

Deniz Dogan
2010-01-27 21:40:34 UTC (about 14 years ago)

Create web page? (correction)

2010/1/27 Claus Cyrny :

Deniz Dogan wrote:

2010/1/27 Nathan Lane :

http://www.W3Schools.com has the most up-to-date tutorials on HTML and CSS, which are the two technologies you need to learn to achieve the creation of a decent website, even if it is simple. Nathan

My "At least I fail to understand that" was actually supposed to be a comment on the following:

Lots of professional web developers ridicule W3 Schools often, but it's a good place to find quick (and dirty) information.

Not that I agree fully with the critics of W3 Schools, but I think it may be because much of the documentation on there is targeted towards older browsers. (Please, don't quote me on that.)

lorth
2010-01-28 03:47:44 UTC (about 14 years ago)

Create web page?

Am Mittwoch, den 27.01.2010, 17:13 +0100 schrieb Deniz Dogan:

2010/1/27 Nathan Lane :

I have not hear that. Why would "professional developers" ridicule the body of computer scientists who work hard to make it possible for them to develop more easily. W3C is the only reason that HTML works on every browser on every operating system. It's the reason we have CSS. Without the W3C JavaScript would still be useless. They also develop the standards for the Internet in general. It's too bad that some developers ridicule they very root reason they have a job or a hobby. W3Schools is a W3C website.

I'm not saying *W3C* is a bad thing and I'd doubt any serious web developer would say that either. All I'm saying is that the impression I've gotten from working with other web developers (in real life and on the Internet) is that W3 Schools is silly. I don't know why.

word is that they have a lot of tutorials where they explain one thing in basics and such, which is nice if you dont have a clue at all, but aparently they tend to leave out alot of security-related information while doing so, which leads to alot of people creating insecure websites.
which is... just bad.

W3 Schools is not associated with W3C as far as I know. Why would W3C have lots of ads and banners on any of their websites?

Nathan Lane
2010-01-28 20:15:29 UTC (about 14 years ago)

Create web page?

Sorry, you are right. W3C does not own W3Schools. Thanks for that. W3C does only go over the very basics of everything they offer. Which may make it silly. At any rate it is a good starting point and utilizes the W3C standards as a workbench. That was the point I was trying to make. Crap I feel bad that I was wrong. Thanks for correcting me.

On Wed, Jan 27, 2010 at 9:13 AM, Deniz Dogan wrote:

2010/1/27 Nathan Lane :

I have not hear that. Why would "professional developers" ridicule the

body

of computer scientists who work hard to make it possible for them to

develop

more easily. W3C is the only reason that HTML works on every browser on every operating system. It's the reason we have CSS. Without the W3C JavaScript would still be useless. They also develop the standards for

the

Internet in general. It's too bad that some developers ridicule they very root reason they have a job or a hobby. W3Schools is a W3C website.

I'm not saying *W3C* is a bad thing and I'd doubt any serious web developer would say that either. All I'm saying is that the impression I've gotten from working with other web developers (in real life and on the Internet) is that W3 Schools is silly. I don't know why.

W3 Schools is not associated with W3C as far as I know. Why would W3C have lots of ads and banners on any of their websites?

-- Deniz Dogan

Paul Hartman
2010-01-29 00:08:48 UTC (about 14 years ago)

Create web page?

On Thu, Jan 28, 2010 at 1:15 PM, Nathan Lane wrote:

W3C does only go over the very basics of everything they offer. Which may make it silly.

You mean w3schools? :) The names are confusing...

Anyway when I need a HTML or CSS reference I go straight to the source:

http://www.w3.org/TR/1999/REC-html401-19991224/ http://www.w3.org/TR/2002/REC-xhtml1-20020801/ http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS2/

Deniz Dogan
2010-01-29 00:19:31 UTC (about 14 years ago)

Create web page?

2010/1/29 Paul Hartman :

On Thu, Jan 28, 2010 at 1:15 PM, Nathan Lane wrote:

W3C does only go over the very basics of everything they offer. Which may make it silly.

You mean w3schools? :) The names are confusing...

Anyway when I need a HTML or CSS reference I go straight to the source:

http://www.w3.org/TR/1999/REC-html401-19991224/ http://www.w3.org/TR/2002/REC-xhtml1-20020801/ http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS2/

Needless to say there are sources with the same information, but that are easier on the eyes.

This is the syntax of the A element according to the W3C source:

<!ELEMENT A - - (%inline;)* -(A) -- anchor --> <!ATTLIST A
%attrs; -- %coreattrs, %i18n, %events -- charset %Charset; #IMPLIED -- char encoding of linked resource -- type %ContentType; #IMPLIED -- advisory content type -- name CDATA #IMPLIED -- named link end -- href %URI; #IMPLIED -- URI for linked resource -- hreflang %LanguageCode; #IMPLIED -- language code -- rel %LinkTypes; #IMPLIED -- forward link types -- rev %LinkTypes; #IMPLIED -- reverse link types -- accesskey %Character; #IMPLIED -- accessibility key character -- shape %Shape; rect -- for use with client-side image maps -- coords %Coords; #IMPLIED -- for use with client-side image maps -- tabindex NUMBER #IMPLIED -- position in tabbing order -- onfocus %Script; #IMPLIED -- the element got the focus -- onblur %Script; #IMPLIED -- the element lost the focus -- >

Paul Hartman
2010-01-29 00:54:51 UTC (about 14 years ago)

Create web page?

On Thu, Jan 28, 2010 at 5:19 PM, Deniz Dogan wrote:

2010/1/29 Paul Hartman :

On Thu, Jan 28, 2010 at 1:15 PM, Nathan Lane wrote:

W3C does only go over the very basics of everything they offer. Which may make it silly.

You mean w3schools? :) The names are confusing...

Anyway when I need a HTML or CSS reference I go straight to the source:

http://www.w3.org/TR/1999/REC-html401-19991224/ http://www.w3.org/TR/2002/REC-xhtml1-20020801/ http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS2/

Needless to say there are sources with the same information, but that are easier on the eyes.

This is the syntax of the A element according to the W3C source:

<!ELEMENT A - - (%inline;)* -(A) -- anchor --> <!ATTLIST A
%attrs; -- %coreattrs, %i18n, %events -- charset %Charset; #IMPLIED -- char encoding of linked resource -- type %ContentType; #IMPLIED -- advisory content type -- name CDATA #IMPLIED -- named link end -- href %URI; #IMPLIED -- URI for linked resource -- hreflang %LanguageCode; #IMPLIED -- language code -- rel %LinkTypes; #IMPLIED -- forward link types -- rev %LinkTypes; #IMPLIED -- reverse link types -- accesskey %Character; #IMPLIED -- accessibility key character -- shape %Shape; rect -- for use with client-side image maps -- coords %Coords; #IMPLIED -- for use with client-side image maps -- tabindex NUMBER #IMPLIED -- position in tabbing order -- onfocus %Script; #IMPLIED -- the element got the focus -- onblur %Script; #IMPLIED -- the element lost the focus -- >

Well, that is its definition from the DTD, which is what the document is describing in the first place. They are taking the whole DTD and going over each part piece by piece. You forgot to include the rest of the chapter which explains what all of that means and has several pages of human-language descriptions, examples and explanations about all of it. :)

Deniz Dogan
2010-01-29 10:25:19 UTC (about 14 years ago)

Create web page?

2010/1/29 Paul Hartman :

On Thu, Jan 28, 2010 at 5:19 PM, Deniz Dogan wrote:

2010/1/29 Paul Hartman :

On Thu, Jan 28, 2010 at 1:15 PM, Nathan Lane wrote:

W3C does only go over the very basics of everything they offer. Which may make it silly.

You mean w3schools? :) The names are confusing...

Anyway when I need a HTML or CSS reference I go straight to the source:

http://www.w3.org/TR/1999/REC-html401-19991224/ http://www.w3.org/TR/2002/REC-xhtml1-20020801/ http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS2/

Needless to say there are sources with the same information, but that are easier on the eyes.

This is the syntax of the A element according to the W3C source:

<!ELEMENT A - - (%inline;)* -(A)       -- anchor --> <!ATTLIST A
 %attrs;                              -- %coreattrs, %i18n, %events --  charset     %Charset;      #IMPLIED  -- char encoding of linked resource --  type        %ContentType;  #IMPLIED  -- advisory content type --  name        CDATA          #IMPLIED  -- named link end --  href        %URI;          #IMPLIED  -- URI for linked resource --  hreflang    %LanguageCode; #IMPLIED  -- language code --  rel         %LinkTypes;    #IMPLIED  -- forward link types --  rev         %LinkTypes;    #IMPLIED  -- reverse link types --  accesskey   %Character;    #IMPLIED  -- accessibility key character --  shape       %Shape;        rect      -- for use with client-side image maps --  coords      %Coords;       #IMPLIED  -- for use with client-side image maps --  tabindex    NUMBER         #IMPLIED  -- position in tabbing order --  onfocus     %Script;       #IMPLIED  -- the element got the focus --  onblur      %Script;       #IMPLIED  -- the element lost the focus --  >

Well, that is its definition from the DTD, which is what the document is describing in the first place. They are taking the whole DTD and going over each part piece by piece. You forgot to include the rest of the chapter which explains what all of that means and has several pages of human-language descriptions, examples and explanations about all of it. :)

While I see your point, I hope you see mine! :)

Imagine a newbie going to W3C to learn how to make basic websites. He/she shouldn't have to know about the charset, type, name, hreflang, rel, rev, accesskey, shape, coords, tabindex, onfocus or onblur attributes. What the newbie *really* needs to know is Text!

Programmer In Training
2010-01-29 13:46:22 UTC (about 14 years ago)

[OT]Web Design [Was Re: Create web page?]

On 1/29/2010 3:25 AM, Deniz Dogan wrote:

2010/1/29 Paul Hartman :

Well, that is its definition from the DTD, which is what the document is describing in the first place. They are taking the whole DTD and going over each part piece by piece. You forgot to include the rest of the chapter which explains what all of that means and has several pages of human-language descriptions, examples and explanations about all of it. :)

While I see your point, I hope you see mine! :)

Imagine a newbie going to W3C to learn how to make basic websites. He/she shouldn't have to know about the charset, type, name, hreflang, rel, rev, accesskey, shape, coords, tabindex, onfocus or onblur attributes. What the newbie *really* needs to know is Text!

That is a good point, but again, one can skim and scan the W3C docs very easily. Examples are numerous and easy to find (generally right after a description of use).

Anyway, this discussion is way off-topic for this list, so for the bottom line:

Use the right tool for the right job. GIMP and OOo are not meant as web design tools (although you can probably get away with using both in a pinch). OOo is an office suite and GIMP is an image manipulation program. Depending on your platform, there is a ton of tools available to get you going in the right direction without being complex or hard to use. I even have a few recommendations:

Windows: NoteTab (requires at least basic knowledge) CoffeeCup HTML Editor (free or paid version, both are awesome) Notepad (requires at least basic knowledge)

*Nix: Quanta
Bluefish
vim (requires at least basic knowledge) CoffeeCup HTML Editor[0]

I cannot recommend for Mac as I have no clue what's available. Of the ones that I didn't mark as requiring basic knowledge, they all have a list of tags and at least CoffeeCup has several wizards to get you going on the right foot. The latest version for Windows also has a WYSIWYG mode.

vim and NoteTab both offer syntax highlighting to make up for the lack of automation that the others provide (although last I checked, NoteTab did offer a list of valid tags).

[0]: Last time I checked, there was a Linux version of CoffeeCup's HTML editor, but it's been a while since I've looked at that. I generally resort to vim on *Nix.

2010-02-25 17:50:44 UTC (almost 14 years ago)
postings
1

Create web page?

I can recommend a tutorial resource on the web forms - php form tutorials. Provides expertise to create and work with different forms.