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Certification plans

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Certification plans mikolaskova 18 Jun 07:22
  Certification plans Steve Kinney 18 Jun 19:09
   Certification plans Ofnuts 18 Jun 19:30
    Certification plans Steve Kinney 18 Jun 20:34
    Certification plans Steve Kinney 18 Jun 23:29
     Certification plans Rick Strong 19 Jun 00:16
      Certification plans mikolaskova 19 Jun 16:03
       Certification plans Steve Kinney 19 Jun 17:06
        Certification plans Steve Kinney 19 Jun 18:26
         Certification plans Rick Strong 19 Jun 20:05
mikolaskova
2017-06-18 07:22:46 UTC (2 months ago)

Certification plans

Hello,

I'm working on a project, where existing raster graphic software is being replaced by GIMP.
There was a question about available certification. Are there any official plans?

I found an old thread, where it does not sound too positive about this idea, but maybe things changed.
(this one http://gimp.1065349.n5.nabble.com/Gimp-certification-td17240.html but it got a discussion about GIMP name)

Thanks and regard,

Adriana

-- View this message in context: http://gimp.1065349.n5.nabble.com/Certification-plans-tp51227.html Sent from the Users mailing list archive at Nabble.com.

Steve Kinney
2017-06-18 19:09:06 UTC (2 months ago)

Certification plans

On 06/18/2017 03:22 AM, mikolaskova wrote:

Hello,

I'm working on a project, where existing raster graphic software is being replaced by GIMP.
There was a question about available certification. Are there any official plans?

Certification of what, by who, and for what purpose?

Inquiring minds want to know.

Ofnuts
2017-06-18 19:30:01 UTC (2 months ago)

Certification plans

On 06/18/17 21:09, Steve Kinney wrote:

On 06/18/2017 03:22 AM, mikolaskova wrote:

Hello,

I'm working on a project, where existing raster graphic software is being replaced by GIMP.
There was a question about available certification. Are there any official plans?

Certification of what, by who, and for what purpose?

Inquiring minds want to know.

These are "Professional certifications", that are available in some form or another for many professional softwares. Usually obtained after a (paying) training from the software house: Oracle, Microsoft, RedHat... There are also certifications for FOSS software but since they are issued by many independent companies none of them have much clout. They can look nice on a resume, especially when you are hired on a project basis (consultant, IT services...) but not a true proof of proficiency.

IMHO a Gimp certification is pointless. People that pay you for graphics work look at the result and don't really care how you obtained it. This isn't the same thing as trusting your mission-critical enterprise database or server farm to some unknown individual.

Steve Kinney
2017-06-18 20:34:10 UTC (2 months ago)

Certification plans

On 06/18/2017 03:30 PM, Ofnuts wrote:

On 06/18/17 21:09, Steve Kinney wrote:

On 06/18/2017 03:22 AM, mikolaskova wrote:

Hello,

I'm working on a project, where existing raster graphic software is being
replaced by GIMP.
There was a question about available certification. Are there any official
plans?

Certification of what, by who, and for what purpose?

Inquiring minds want to know.

These are "Professional certifications", that are available in some form or another for many professional softwares. Usually obtained after a (paying) training from the software house: Oracle, Microsoft, RedHat... There are also certifications for FOSS software but since they are issued by many independent companies none of them have much clout. They can look nice on a resume, especially when you are hired on a project basis (consultant, IT services...) but not a true proof of proficiency.

IMHO a Gimp certification is pointless. People that pay you for graphics work look at the result and don't really care how you obtained it. This isn't the same thing as trusting your mission-critical enterprise database or server farm to some unknown individual.

Oh that. As an old QA guy I tend to think of certification in a whole other context, relevant to the fitness for use of deliverables.

I don't think too highly of certificates of completion from vendor specific programs for software users. A primary objective of the coursework in those programs is to prepare the student as an outside sales rep for the vendor, assuring that as much money as possible will be spent with the vendor by certified whatzit's employer, and vendor lock-in firmly established at the enterprise.

:o)

Steve Kinney
2017-06-18 23:29:16 UTC (2 months ago)

Certification plans

On 06/18/2017 03:30 PM, Ofnuts wrote:

IMHO a Gimp certification is pointless. People that pay you for graphics work look at the result and don't really care how you obtained it.

Depends the workplace environment. At a company big enough to have a dedicated HR department, ass covering is always a priority: When you hire people without knowing anything at all about the actual job they are going to do, a certificate from somebody saying the candidate can do that job is evidence of due diligence - and takes no actual work on the part of the interviewer, vs. asking to see examples of a candidate's work, guessing whether it's relevant to the position in question, etc.

An offlist message mentioned a certification program for the GIMP that costs $120 and, per the curriculum on the website, appears to be legit. Any experienced user could probably blow through it in a day or so, unless it is necessary to memorize "wrong answers" to pass.

:o)

Rick Strong
2017-06-19 00:16:57 UTC (2 months ago)

Certification plans

The originator of this question might be better off to become certified by a professional graphic design/graphic communication organization such as the GDC in Canada, ARGD in Ontario, the SDGQ in Qubec, the UCDA (colleges & universities), CAPIC for Illustrators, the AGDA in Australia, the AIGA in the U.S. or ICOGRADA in Europe.

Knowing the software is just the start of a great career.

Rick S.

-----Original Message----- From: Steve Kinney
Sent: Sunday, June 18, 2017 7:29 PM
To: gimp-user-list@gnome.org
Subject: Re: [Gimp-user] Certification plans

On 06/18/2017 03:30 PM, Ofnuts wrote:

IMHO a Gimp certification is pointless. People that pay you for graphics work look at the result and don't really care how you obtained it.

Depends the workplace environment. At a company big enough to have a dedicated HR department, ass covering is always a priority: When you hire people without knowing anything at all about the actual job they are going to do, a certificate from somebody saying the candidate can do that job is evidence of due diligence - and takes no actual work on the part of the interviewer, vs. asking to see examples of a candidate's work, guessing whether it's relevant to the position in question, etc.

An offlist message mentioned a certification program for the GIMP that costs $120 and, per the curriculum on the website, appears to be legit. Any experienced user could probably blow through it in a day or so, unless it is necessary to memorize "wrong answers" to pass.

:o)

mikolaskova
2017-06-19 16:03:29 UTC (2 months ago)

Certification plans

Thank you for your answers. I'm asking because the question showd up in our project-
the people are used to let themselves certify in order to increase job chances in case of changing working place.

The question was: if we switch to GIMP- how can we guaratnee our employees they get experienced in a usefull field. (my general answer is: somebody able to use GIMP for image editing will be able to use other ... software, same as people skilled in this other... software can switch to GIMP without major problems; there is an increasing market for people able to work with GIMP etc...) I know, these questions sound strange somehow but for some institutions it's essential.

And: both kinds of certification would be useful: certified GIMP trainer and certified GIMP user(?)

It's about europe...so I will ask at ICOGRADA (I already am in contact with the LPI)

Best regards,

Adrana

-- View this message in context: http://gimp.1065349.n5.nabble.com/Certification-plans-tp51227p51244.html Sent from the Users mailing list archive at Nabble.com.

Steve Kinney
2017-06-19 17:06:13 UTC (2 months ago)

Certification plans

Here's one:

https://learning.naukri.com/gimp-tutorial-certification-course-v272

Daniel Smith pointed it out in a reply that came to me but not the list; that might have been an error.

It looks legit to me; the course outline is more or less what I would have come up with if asked to design one.

:o)

On 06/19/2017 12:03 PM, mikolaskova wrote:

Thank you for your answers. I'm asking because the question showd up in our project-
the people are used to let themselves certify in order to increase job chances in case of changing working place.

The question was: if we switch to GIMP- how can we guaratnee our employees they get experienced in a usefull field. (my general answer is: somebody able to use GIMP for image editing will be able to use other ... software, same as people skilled in this other... software can switch to GIMP without major problems; there is an increasing market for people able to work with GIMP etc...) I know, these questions sound strange somehow but for some institutions it's essential.

And: both kinds of certification would be useful: certified GIMP trainer and certified GIMP user(?)

It's about europe...so I will ask at ICOGRADA (I already am in contact with the LPI)

Best regards,

Adrana

-- View this message in context: http://gimp.1065349.n5.nabble.com/Certification-plans-tp51227p51244.html Sent from the Users mailing list archive at Nabble.com. _______________________________________________ gimp-user-list mailing list
List address: gimp-user-list@gnome.org List membership: https://mail.gnome.org/mailman/listinfo/gimp-user-list List archives: https://mail.gnome.org/archives/gimp-user-list

Steve Kinney
2017-06-19 18:26:35 UTC (2 months ago)

Certification plans

On 06/19/2017 01:06 PM, Steve Kinney wrote:

Here's one:

https://learning.naukri.com/gimp-tutorial-certification-course-v272

Daniel Smith pointed it out in a reply that came to me but not the list; that might have been an error.

It looks legit to me; the course outline is more or less what I would have come up with if asked to design one.

:o)

We should also mentioned Scribus, the major Free Software desktop publishing application. IMO a GIMP user certification program should include a unit on using Scribus: Unless an image is intended for use on a website or in a word processor document, page layout and export to a print ready file format (normally PDF) is the necessary final stage of image production, even if only to test color rendering and make "contact sheet" indexes of finished images. Scribus is very simple and easy to use, although as with any tool it takes a little tinkering and getting used to.

I should also mention Inkscape, the major Free Software vector graphics editor. Applications for vector graphic formats include offset printing, posters and signage, and any context where really precise manipulation of text (font) content or line drawings is needed. Vector format image content scales to any size with no loss of resolution, hence the name of the SVG "scalable vector graphic" file format. Image content that is frequently reused in many contexts, i.e. company logos, should be designed as vector graphics to begin with; otherwise, it will be necessary to re-create them as such sooner or later. Inkscape can export vector images to PNG, JPG, EPS, etc.

This online program offers a "certificate of completion" that makes it the closest thing to Inkscape user certification I found in a quick web search:

http://www.trainingcenter.com/inkscape

Anyone who can only edit raster graphics (i.e. GIMP) or vector graphics (i.e. Inkscape) is only half a general purpose graphics production worker.

:o)

Rick Strong
2017-06-19 20:05:48 UTC (2 months ago)

Certification plans

I concur with Steve Kinney that Scribus and Inkscape are also valuable tools to be adroit in, for the reasons he mentioned.

Rick S.

-----Original Message----- From: Steve Kinney
Sent: Monday, June 19, 2017 2:26 PM
To: gimp-user-list@gnome.org
Subject: Re: [Gimp-user] Certification plans

On 06/19/2017 01:06 PM, Steve Kinney wrote:

Here's one:

https://learning.naukri.com/gimp-tutorial-certification-course-v272

Daniel Smith pointed it out in a reply that came to me but not the list; that might have been an error.

It looks legit to me; the course outline is more or less what I would have come up with if asked to design one.

:o)

We should also mentioned Scribus, the major Free Software desktop publishing application. IMO a GIMP user certification program should include a unit on using Scribus: Unless an image is intended for use on a website or in a word processor document, page layout and export to a print ready file format (normally PDF) is the necessary final stage of image production, even if only to test color rendering and make "contact sheet" indexes of finished images. Scribus is very simple and easy to use, although as with any tool it takes a little tinkering and getting used to.

I should also mention Inkscape, the major Free Software vector graphics editor. Applications for vector graphic formats include offset printing, posters and signage, and any context where really precise manipulation of text (font) content or line drawings is needed. Vector format image content scales to any size with no loss of resolution, hence the name of the SVG "scalable vector graphic" file format. Image content that is frequently reused in many contexts, i.e. company logos, should be designed as vector graphics to begin with; otherwise, it will be necessary to re-create them as such sooner or later. Inkscape can export vector images to PNG, JPG, EPS, etc.

This online program offers a "certificate of completion" that makes it the closest thing to Inkscape user certification I found in a quick web search:

http://www.trainingcenter.com/inkscape

Anyone who can only edit raster graphics (i.e. GIMP) or vector graphics (i.e. Inkscape) is only half a general purpose graphics production worker.

:o)