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GIMP 2.8 less productive than GIMP 2.6 (too many dialogue boxes)

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GIMP 2.8 less productive than GIMP 2.6 (too many dialogue boxes) Coocoocoo Coo 21 Jun 13:05
  GIMP 2.8 less productive than GIMP 2.6 (too many dialogue boxes) Richard Gitschlag 23 Jun 17:34
GIMP 2.8 less productive than GIMP 2.6 (too many dialogue boxes) Dima Ursu 23 Jun 14:49
Coocoocoo Coo
2012-06-21 13:05:07 UTC (about 2 years ago)

GIMP 2.8 less productive than GIMP 2.6 (too many dialogue boxes)

To: GIMP devs and users

Having recently made the upgrade to GIMP 2.8, it's immediately obvious to me as a long time user that GIMP is now a far less productive application. Some aspects that I find particularly obtrusive:

-> The "Export" vs Save implementation: this alone already made me go back to 2.6, at least until this "feature" is made optional or removed from GIMP altogether. Previously, all I had to do to save an image in any desired format after editing it, was to use "Save as" exactly as I would in any other program; now I have to go through multiple dialogue windows and manually select the same options ALL THE TIME (such as the dreadful "Do Not write colour space information" for BMPs), since they aren't assumed by GIMP for future operations. Even something that should be as simple as a quick modification followed by a CTRL+S to overwrite the same image in its own native format has become an headache.

-> When saving (pardon me, "exporting") images to JPG, the advanced options dialogue DOES NOT assume the defaults as selected by the user after clicking on "Save Defaults"; instead, it expects the user to click on "Load Defaults" ALL THE TIME! How obtuse can this be ? I don't want to have to manually load my defaults ALL THE TIME, that's as much troublesome and time consuming as just selecting those same options myself ALL THE TIME. If I have a "Save Defaults" option, what I want it to do is exactly what it says - GIMP *automatically* assuming those options the next time I get to save an image as JPG. That's what "defaults" in computer programs means.

The way I see it, a computer application improves when it gets more intuitive and faster to use. Alas, this is not the case with such GIMP implementations as the above ones. Having to do the same operations while using more time and more steps than before is not an improvement - it's a step backwards.

If it's your desire to keep this kind of counter-productive "features" in place to cater for people who can't use a computer correctly and thus need all those repetitive dialogue boxes and safety checks just as the typical Windows initiate needs to go through multiple "Yes/No" buttons just to copy, move or delete a file (because he'd otherwise ruin his own work, out of his own inepcy), then at least PLEASE make them optional in the next version or a patch so that experienced users can get them out of the way and get their GIMP productivity back.

Thank you very much.

Dima Ursu
2012-06-23 14:49:32 UTC (about 2 years ago)

GIMP 2.8 less productive than GIMP 2.6 (too many dialogue boxes)

On 06/23/2012 05:31 PM, Guillermo Espertino (Gez) wrote:

El 21/06/12 10:05, Coocoocoo Coo escribi:

To: GIMP devs and users

Having recently made the upgrade to GIMP 2.8, it's immediately obvious to me as a long time user that GIMP is now a far less productive application. Some aspects that I find particularly obtrusive:...

Coocoocoo Coo:
The save vs. export issue has been discussed extensively in a previous thread and the other issue you're describing is a bug that afaik has been addressed and a fix will be released in 2.8.1 So, you are saying that has been already said and describing a bug that has been already described, and in a quite disrespectful manner (assuming a bug is an obtuse decision from developers isn't very polite if you ask me)

And btw, be careful when you say that something is "obvious". It may be obvious for you, but some people may disagree. Personally I don't think this changes make me less productive, and I'm also a long time user. So who's right here?

Gez

I use GIMP for more than 2 years, and all the discomfort I've noticed when switching from 2.6 to 2.8 was remembering a shortcut for exporting: CTRL + SHIFT + E. Is that so hard? Stop whining.

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Richard Gitschlag
2012-06-23 17:34:01 UTC (about 2 years ago)

GIMP 2.8 less productive than GIMP 2.6 (too many dialogue boxes)

Date: Thu, 21 Jun 2012 06:05:07 -0700 From: doodoodeedoo@yahoo.com
To: gimp-developer-list@gnome.org
Subject: [Gimp-developer] GIMP 2.8 less productive than GIMP 2.6 (too many dialogue boxes)

----------- To: GIMP devs and users

Having recently made the upgrade to GIMP 2.8, it's immediately obvious to me as a long time user that GIMP is now a far less productive application. Some aspects that I find particularly obtrusive:

-> The "Export" vs Save implementation: this alone already made me go back to 2.6, at least until this "feature" is made optional or removed from GIMP altogether. Previously, all I had to do to save an image in any desired format after editing it, was to use "Save as" exactly as I would in any other program; now I have to go through multiple dialogue windows and manually select the same options ALL THE TIME (such as the dreadful "Do Not write colour space information" for BMPs), since they aren't assumed by GIMP for future operations. Even something that should be as simple as a quick modification followed by a CTRL+S to overwrite the same image in its own native format has become an headache. ------------

I'm not particularly fond of the save/export distinction ... in its current form. I can agree that the distinction is generally a positive one, as in, used correctly there are decidedly fewer dialogues to wade through for writing a non-XCF file to disk than there were in 2.6.

BUT I think there are some minor things that completely ruin productivity for certain styles of workflow. For example, the fact that "Export" (Ctrl+E) and "Overwrite" (no default shortcut) are two separate commands. I believe this is a horrible design decision when the only pertinent difference between them is whether or not the current image session originated from a non-XCF file.

If I'm creating a single-layer composition and choose to store it on disk as a PNG. Okay, so Save is intended for XCF now, use Export instead, that is a bit of a speed-bump but the Export commands are on the same menu and they even have similar keyboard shortcuts set up. Ctrl+E it is, first it asks me for a filename (just as the Save command would with a new file), but subsequent uses just writes the file to disk in a single keystroke with no further prompts (also just like the Save command would do with an XCF).

That is, UNTIL I come back later in a new GIMP session. Now it is considered an 'imported' image, so the 'Export' is replaced by 'Overwrite', and I have no keyboard shortcut for writing changes back to the file NQA. If I hit Ctrl+E (which for some reason still remains invokable) I have to go through all the usual Export prompts as if I've never exported the file before, but including a new prompt asking whether to overwrite the existing file. THIS is the real productivity-killer.

It is not GIMP's place to judge the merits of its user's individual workflow. It is GIMP's job to do what they tell it to do, to the best of its ability (i.e. within the scope of its design vision). I always viewed GIMP as being able to accommodate a wide variety of different workflows ... is that now saying that GIMP has a multiple-personality disorder? I think not.

-- Stratadrake strata_ranger@hotmail.com
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Numbers may not lie, but neither do they tell the whole truth.