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problems with understand how to resize images properly

This discussion is connected to the gimp-user-list.gnome.org mailing list which is provided by the GIMP developers and not related to gimpusers.com.

2017-11-20 14:05:01 UTC (22 days ago)
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problems with understand how to resize images properly

Good Day!

I am a newbie learner to “” and I am trying to accomplish a series of steps, but things just don’t seem to work out for me.

I have 2 problems, well more but I wont go into everything 

- Basically I am trying to import a picture of varing sizes, and then resize them to fit a specific size.

For example, I am importing an image that is 5” x 3”, and wanting to print it on a label, So I need to be able to copy it out of GIMP, and past it into a Avery Shipping Label template in Word.

I have been a little successful, but I am having issues with the sizes changing.

Steps I am completing.

1- Open Image. 2- Click menu “Image” and then click Scale image 3- I assign the Size height as 1.30 inches (because of the linked reference, width defaults to 2.0 inches ISH 4- Resolution seems to imply its 76 x 76 5- And it seems like it works, though when I COPY and paste into Word and print. The size is a little off.

However, I went on to the next picture, which ultimately was a desktop image , I completed the following

1- Open Image. 2- Click menu “Image” and then click Scale image 3- I assign the Size height as 1.30 inches (because of the linked reference, width defaults to 2.0 inches ISH 4- Resolution seems to imply its 560 x 560 (don’t have the real numbers handy) 5- Then I copy it , and then Paste into Word. 6- When I look at the image in my template the image height should be 1.3, but its about 2.3. and the width is also messed up.

I am confused. If I tell them image to be 1.3 why is it not listening? I understand there is a setting called Print size somewhere, but I am trying to make the image Size X, but something else is getting in the way.

I am hoping someone can give me an answer, or maybe point me to a Youtube video that goes over it. I have watched about 6-8 tutorials, but I cant find anything that goes into that whole aspect of

~

Steve Kinney
2017-11-21 21:15:35 UTC (21 days ago)

problems with understand how to resize images properly

On 11/20/2017 09:05 AM, menglor wrote:

Good Day!

I am a newbie learner to “” and I am trying to accomplish a series of steps, but things just don’t seem to work out for me.

I have 2 problems, well more but I wont go into everything 

- Basically I am trying to import a picture of varing sizes, and then resize them to fit a specific size.

For example, I am importing an image that is 5” x 3”, and wanting to print it on a label,
So I need to be able to copy it out of GIMP, and past it into a Avery Shipping Label template in Word.

I have been a little successful, but I am having issues with the sizes changing.

Hi menglor,

The process you describe will give you images of different sizes if the originals have different DPI values, because when you scale an image to be a certain number of inches in size, the GIMP looks at the DPI resolution of the image first, then scales the image to be X number of pixels wide/tall based on that DPI and the physical dimensions you specify.

Example: A 300 DPI image scaled to 1" x 1" will come out 300 pixels wide. A 150 DPI image scaled to 1" x 1" will come out 150 pixels wide - half "size" of the 300 DPI one.

Scaling images by adjusting their size in inches (or centimeters, etc.) is rarely done. Useful results require resetting the DPI of images as necessary, so a set of images of the same size in inches, cm or etc. will also be the same size in pixels.

Or can multiply the size in inches of the output images you want by the DPI you want, to get the correct dimensions in pixels for /all/ the images intended to be the same size when printed. From that point on, you can just scale your whole batch of images to the same size in pixels and ignore the size "in inches."

The DPI setting in an image is only a number recorded in the file header; changing the DPI of an image changes nothing but that one number, and as far as I know it does not affect the actual or displayed / printed size of the image, except when scaling the image in an editor like the GIMP.

Typical DPI values:

300 DPI for high quality print 150 DPI for office documents etc. where "good enough is good enough" 96 DPI for on-screen display
72 DPI - a legacy default setting based on printers' "point" size

Note that doubling the DPI of an image while maintaining the same print size when scaling, multiplies the size of the resulting file on disk by about 4x. Exporting images in lossless PNG format (vs. lossy JPG) for maximum print quality also creates much larger file sizes on disk. So big, high quality print jobs can take up a lot of space in storage or time in transit across the network.

You also mentioned printing via a Word document, and that the sizes you get are a little off. I think that's to be expected, because word processors were not intended for "pre-press" work, a.k.a. printing images with high accuracy.

I use Scribus, a Free desktop publishing application, for pre-press work. Make your images, put them on the page exactly where you want them, export the file as PDF and print that: Viola, accurate results.

For really precise positioning on page, i.e. when printing on peel and stick label stock or etc., it may be necessary to print a test page, measure any placement errors, and adjust the Scribus master document to get your required results from that particular printer.

https://www.scribus.net/

:o)

Steps I am completing.

1- Open Image. 2- Click menu “Image” and then click Scale image 3- I assign the Size height as 1.30 inches (because of the linked reference, width defaults to 2.0 inches ISH
4- Resolution seems to imply its 76 x 76 5- And it seems like it works, though when I COPY and paste into Word and print. The size is a little off.

However, I went on to the next picture, which ultimately was a desktop image , I completed the following

1- Open Image. 2- Click menu “Image” and then click Scale image 3- I assign the Size height as 1.30 inches (because of the linked reference, width defaults to 2.0 inches ISH
4- Resolution seems to imply its 560 x 560 (don’t have the real numbers handy) 5- Then I copy it , and then Paste into Word. 6- When I look at the image in my template the image height should be 1.3, but its about 2.3. and the width is also messed up.

I am confused. If I tell them image to be 1.3 why is it not listening? I understand there is a setting called Print size somewhere, but I am trying to make the image Size X, but something else is getting in the way.

I am hoping someone can give me an answer, or maybe point me to a Youtube video that goes over it. I have watched about 6-8 tutorials, but I cant find anything that goes into that whole aspect of

2017-11-22 12:46:31 UTC (20 days ago)
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problems with understand how to resize images properly

Thanks for your reply. I am reading through what your saying, and I cross posted this question on another site and getting a similar answer.

I dont want to duplicate the work, but I need to get some kind of "simple" working solution. so I am hoping I can comment a few things and maybe drive the conversion differently and maybe something I missed will come out.

I understand GIMP and probably ALL graphical software behaves similarly. and I dont expect that will change. but here is my dilema.

I have a working surface of 2.42 x 1.30 to display what I am trying to do. the specification are that. and I can be smaller on the 2.42, but I have to be Razor sharp on the 1.3 measurements when I print the label.

Its been mu experience, with Gimp, I can get the 1.3 nailed on the screen, and I have to fill in from 2.0 to 2.4 with a color match because scaling isnt bang on.

As well, what I am capturing from multiple sources so DPI and physical size will change. and I would rather it take minutes rather then hours to do it.

The part I am struggling with is your comment:

Example: A 300 DPI image scaled to 1" x 1" will come out 300 pixels wide. A 150 DPI image scaled to 1" x 1" will come out 150 pixels wide half "size" of the 300 DPI one.

its somewhat ODD for me to hear, that a 1 x 1 inch image, is half the size of another 1 x 1 inch image.

If I was building an engine for your car, and you told me it has to 24" by 48" and I delivered you an engine that was double that, you would laugh at me, and it wouldnt fit.

and I will go one further and even replicate a comment I posted elsewhere, When I created a 1" x 1" image at 300 dpi, Gimp still showed me the image on the screen with a ruler as 1" x 1", but when I pasted the object into MS Paint, it said it was 3"

So, with all that whining done, let me ask this question.

- I need to create an image that is 2.42 x 1.30 in size. - I know when I scale any image to 1.3 I end up with a 2.0 x 1.3 image. - I need to be able to take ANY image I want. scale it down to size - Fill in the buffer between 2.42 and 2.0 with the appropriate background color. - Paste it into "something" that will allow me to print it too a Avery label sheet. - Cut it with a knife and apply it on a surface like a tube, where the circumference of the item is 1.3" in size. - There can be no over lap.

- its been suggested, that I resize the image in Word or other programs outside of Gimp, but Word or other programs dont offer the granularity or precision that Gimp does, so from my view point, its like asking me to write my resume in Excel.

Do you have any suggestions ? I will be looking at Scribus tonight or Friday. But I am looking for a solution to render the above in a fairly short period of time, the Avery templates have 10 labels. and I never expect to print the same picture twice.

Hi menglor,

The process you describe will give you images of different sizes if the
originals have different DPI values, because when you scale an image to
be a certain number of inches in size, the GIMP looks at the DPI resolution of the image first, then scales the image to be X number of pixels wide/tall based on that DPI and the physical dimensions you specify.

Example: A 300 DPI image scaled to 1" x 1" will come out 300 pixels wide. A 150 DPI image scaled to 1" x 1" will come out 150 pixels wide -
half "size" of the 300 DPI one.

Scaling images by adjusting their size in inches (or centimeters, etc.)
is rarely done. Useful results require resetting the DPI of images as necessary, so a set of images of the same size in inches, cm or etc. will also be the same size in pixels.

Or can multiply the size in inches of the output images you want by the
DPI you want, to get the correct dimensions in pixels for /all/ the images intended to be the same size when printed. From that point on, you can just scale your whole batch of images to the same size in pixels
and ignore the size "in inches."

The DPI setting in an image is only a number recorded in the file header; changing the DPI of an image changes nothing but that one number, and as far as I know it does not affect the actual or displayed
/ printed size of the image, except when scaling the image in an editor
like the GIMP.

Typical DPI values:

300 DPI for high quality print 150 DPI for office documents etc. where "good enough is good enough" 96 DPI for on-screen display
72 DPI - a legacy default setting based on printers' "point" size

Note that doubling the DPI of an image while maintaining the same print
size when scaling, multiplies the size of the resulting file on disk by
about 4x. Exporting images in lossless PNG format (vs. lossy JPG) for maximum print quality also creates much larger file sizes on disk. So big, high quality print jobs can take up a lot of space in storage or time in transit across the network.

You also mentioned printing via a Word document, and that the sizes you
get are a little off. I think that's to be expected, because word processors were not intended for "pre-press" work, a.k.a. printing images with high accuracy.

I use Scribus, a Free desktop publishing application, for pre-press work. Make your images, put them on the page exactly where you want them, export the file as PDF and print that: Viola, accurate results.

For really precise positioning on page, i.e. when printing on peel and stick label stock or etc., it may be necessary to print a test page, measure any placement errors, and adjust the Scribus master document to
get your required results from that particular printer.

https://www.scribus.net/

:o)

Rick Strong
2017-11-28 07:00:33 UTC (15 days ago)

problems with understand how to resize images properly

Here's a trick that may--or may not--work for you.

WORD has a menu item under the "Mailings" tab that says "Labels". Click on this and you will be presented with a dialogue screen that allows you to enter the text--or a photo--for a single label, say an Avery 5160.

When you click "New Document" the text you have typed is repeated down and across the page in the correct places and the correct number of times for the label you have chosen. The action is called "Step & Repeat" in the trade. For 5160 labels it is S&R'd 30 times. I Tried this with an 8" x 6" image and it automatically reduced the photo to fit on the label.

Whether this leaves you enough room to type text is another question. Play with the text wrap on the image. I suggest tight. While I think GIMP is a great program, sometimes there are other ways to solve a problem. The auto-label maker in WORD is a nice feature and can be used to print images on labels.

Cheers,
Rick S.

-----Original Message----- From: menglor
Sent: Monday, November 20, 2017 9:05 AM To: gimp-user-list@gnome.org
Cc: notifications@gimpusers.com
Subject: [Gimp-user] problems with understand how to resize images properly

Good Day!

I am a newbie learner to “” and I am trying to accomplish a series of steps, but
things just don’t seem to work out for me.

I have 2 problems, well more but I wont go into everything 

- Basically I am trying to import a picture of varing sizes, and then resize
them to fit a specific size.

For example, I am importing an image that is 5” x 3”, and wanting to print
it on a label,
So I need to be able to copy it out of GIMP, and past it into a Avery Shipping
Label template in Word.

I have been a little successful, but I am having issues with the sizes changing.

Steps I am completing.

1- Open Image. 2- Click menu “Image” and then click Scale image 3- I assign the Size height as 1.30 inches (because of the linked reference,
width defaults to 2.0 inches ISH
4- Resolution seems to imply its 76 x 76 5- And it seems like it works, though when I COPY and paste into Word and print.
The size is a little off.

However, I went on to the next picture, which ultimately was a desktop image ,
I completed the following

1- Open Image. 2- Click menu “Image” and then click Scale image 3- I assign the Size height as 1.30 inches (because of the linked reference,
width defaults to 2.0 inches ISH
4- Resolution seems to imply its 560 x 560 (don’t have the real numbers handy)
5- Then I copy it , and then Paste into Word. 6- When I look at the image in my template the image height should be 1.3, but
its about 2.3. and the width is also messed up.

I am confused. If I tell them image to be 1.3 why is it not listening? I understand there is a setting called Print size somewhere, but I am trying to
make the image Size X, but something else is getting in the way.

I am hoping someone can give me an answer, or maybe point me to a Youtube video
that goes over it. I have watched about 6-8 tutorials, but I cant find anything that goes into that whole aspect of

~

menglor (via www.gimpusers.com/forums)
2017-11-28 12:29:16 UTC (14 days ago)
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problems with understand how to resize images properly

Thank you, I will give it a try.

I am pretty sure it wont work for me because I am actually cutting out the picture inside the lable. so its not the label size I need, but a smaller piece of it.

2017-11-30 14:58:37 UTC (12 days ago)
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problems with understand how to resize images properly

Hi menglor,

The process you describe will give you images of different sizes if the
originals have different DPI values, because when you scale an image to
be a certain number of inches in size, the GIMP looks at the DPI resolution of the image first, then scales the image to be X number of pixels wide/tall based on that DPI and the physical dimensions you specify.

Example: A 300 DPI image scaled to 1" x 1" will come out 300 pixels wide. A 150 DPI image scaled to 1" x 1" will come out 150 pixels wide -
half "size" of the 300 DPI one.

Scaling images by adjusting their size in inches (or centimeters, etc.)
is rarely done. Useful results require resetting the DPI of images as necessary, so a set of images of the same size in inches, cm or etc. will also be the same size in pixels.

Or can multiply the size in inches of the output images you want by the
DPI you want, to get the correct dimensions in pixels for /all/ the images intended to be the same size when printed. From that point on, you can just scale your whole batch of images to the same size in pixels
and ignore the size "in inches."

The DPI setting in an image is only a number recorded in the file header; changing the DPI of an image changes nothing but that one number, and as far as I know it does not affect the actual or displayed
/ printed size of the image, except when scaling the image in an editor
like the GIMP.

Typical DPI values:

300 DPI for high quality print 150 DPI for office documents etc. where "good enough is good enough" 96 DPI for on-screen display
72 DPI - a legacy default setting based on printers' "point" size

Note that doubling the DPI of an image while maintaining the same print
size when scaling, multiplies the size of the resulting file on disk by
about 4x. Exporting images in lossless PNG format (vs. lossy JPG) for maximum print quality also creates much larger file sizes on disk. So big, high quality print jobs can take up a lot of space in storage or time in transit across the network.

You also mentioned printing via a Word document, and that the sizes you
get are a little off. I think that's to be expected, because word processors were not intended for "pre-press" work, a.k.a. printing images with high accuracy.

I use Scribus, a Free desktop publishing application, for pre-press work. Make your images, put them on the page exactly where you want them, export the file as PDF and print that: Viola, accurate results.

For really precise positioning on page, i.e. when printing on peel and stick label stock or etc., it may be necessary to print a test page, measure any placement errors, and adjust the Scribus master document to
get your required results from that particular printer.

https://www.scribus.net/

:o)

Thanks. Seems like learned some new things today. :D

2017-12-08 11:08:48 UTC (5 days ago)
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problems with understand how to resize images properly

Hi, I too have an issue understanding how resizing works, especially with reference to Word. I wasn't sure if I should post a new thread, but decided this was sort of pertinent to my issue. Please let me know if I should create a new post.

Basically, If I have a big image (a signature, black and white, about 1000 pixels wide), then insert into Word, and resize it ( to about a tenth of it's size) it looks fantastic. If I take the image, resize it in Gimp (or anything else for that matter) from 1000 to 100, it looks really bitty and blocky, and inserting to Word it remains bitty and blocky..

Why is this? Is this to do with the dpi as well? And is there a work around?

Thanks

Hi menglor,

The process you describe will give you images of different sizes if the
originals have different DPI values, because when you scale an image to
be a certain number of inches in size, the GIMP looks at the DPI resolution of the image first, then scales the image to be X number of pixels wide/tall based on that DPI and the physical dimensions you specify.

Example: A 300 DPI image scaled to 1" x 1" will come out 300 pixels wide. A 150 DPI image scaled to 1" x 1" will come out 150 pixels wide -
half "size" of the 300 DPI one.

Scaling images by adjusting their size in inches (or centimeters, etc.)
is rarely done. Useful results require resetting the DPI of images as necessary, so a set of images of the same size in inches, cm or etc. will also be the same size in pixels.

Or can multiply the size in inches of the output images you want by the
DPI you want, to get the correct dimensions in pixels for /all/ the images intended to be the same size when printed. From that point on, you can just scale your whole batch of images to the same size in pixels
and ignore the size "in inches."

The DPI setting in an image is only a number recorded in the file header; changing the DPI of an image changes nothing but that one number, and as far as I know it does not affect the actual or displayed
/ printed size of the image, except when scaling the image in an editor
like the GIMP.

Typical DPI values:

300 DPI for high quality print 150 DPI for office documents etc. where "good enough is good enough" 96 DPI for on-screen display
72 DPI - a legacy default setting based on printers' "point" size

Note that doubling the DPI of an image while maintaining the same print
size when scaling, multiplies the size of the resulting file on disk by
about 4x. Exporting images in lossless PNG format (vs. lossy JPG) for maximum print quality also creates much larger file sizes on disk. So big, high quality print jobs can take up a lot of space in storage or time in transit across the network.

You also mentioned printing via a Word document, and that the sizes you
get are a little off. I think that's to be expected, because word processors were not intended for "pre-press" work, a.k.a. printing images with high accuracy.

I use Scribus, a Free desktop publishing application, for pre-press work. Make your images, put them on the page exactly where you want them, export the file as PDF and print that: Viola, accurate results.

For really precise positioning on page, i.e. when printing on peel and stick label stock or etc., it may be necessary to print a test page, measure any placement errors, and adjust the Scribus master document to
get your required results from that particular printer.

https://www.scribus.net/

:o)

2017-12-08 12:26:41 UTC (4 days ago)
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problems with understand how to resize images properly

I may not be able to answer your question, but I can explain a few things that I am taking on blind faith and its working.

So, start with the Work you want to resize, and create a new object with the desired size your trying to get. then copy one into the other.

Then the magic piece is to Export to a Jpg, and from word "Insert it as a image"

I am finding that if you let the application think, it over does it.

Hi, I too have an issue understanding how resizing works, especially with reference to Word.
I wasn't sure if I should post a new thread, but decided this was sort of pertinent to my issue.
Please let me know if I should create a new post.

Basically, If I have a big image (a signature, black and white, about 1000 pixels wide), then insert into Word, and resize it ( to about a tenth of it's size) it looks fantastic. If I take the image, resize it in Gimp (or anything else for that matter) from 1000 to 100, it looks really bitty and blocky, and inserting to Word it remains bitty and blocky..

Why is this? Is this to do with the dpi as well? And is there a work around?

Thanks

2017-12-08 12:41:59 UTC (4 days ago)
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problems with understand how to resize images properly

Hi, I too have an issue understanding how resizing works, especially with reference to Word.
I wasn't sure if I should post a new thread, but decided this was sort of pertinent to my issue.
Please let me know if I should create a new post.

Basically, If I have a big image (a signature, black and white, about 1000 pixels wide), then insert into Word, and resize it ( to about a tenth of it's size) it looks fantastic. If I take the image, resize it in Gimp (or anything else for that matter) from 1000 to 100, it looks really bitty and blocky, and inserting to Word it remains bitty and blocky..

Why is this? Is this to do with the dpi as well? And is there a work around?

Thanks

Gimp is a raster editor and works in pixels. When you scale an image, the pixels are not scaled they stay the same so for your signature image reduced to 10% means several hundred pixels are crammed into maybe a dozen: see screenshot 1

You can get a little improvement by pre-blurring the large image but 1-10th the size is asking a lot.

For a better result convert the raster image into a vector image, typically a SVG. You can do this using freeware Inkscape or there are online converters.

In a document for comparison, the type size is 14 to give some idea of scale. screenshot 2

rich: www.gimp-forum.net

2017-12-08 15:18:07 UTC (4 days ago)
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problems with understand how to resize images properly

Thanks ...
Not quite sure what you mean ...

"So, start with the Work you want to resize, and create a new object with the desired size your trying to get. then copy one into the other."

Do you mean do the above In Gimp2? Then export to a jpg from gimp2?

Thanks

I may not be able to answer your question, but I can explain a few things that I am taking on blind faith and its working.

So, start with the Work you want to resize, and create a new object with the desired size your trying to get. then copy one into the other.

Then the magic piece is to Export to a Jpg, and from word "Insert it as a image"

I am finding that if you let the application think, it over does it.

2017-12-08 15:19:23 UTC (4 days ago)
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problems with understand how to resize images properly

Thanks - I'll give it a go.

Cheers

Gimp is a raster editor and works in pixels. When you scale an image, the pixels are not scaled they stay the same so for your signature image reduced to 10% means several hundred pixels are crammed into maybe a dozen: see screenshot 1

You can get a little improvement by pre-blurring the large image but 1-10th the size is asking a lot.

For a better result convert the raster image into a vector image, typically a SVG. You can do this using freeware Inkscape or there are online converters.

In a document for comparison, the type size is 14 to give some idea of scale. screenshot 2

rich: www.gimp-forum.net

2017-12-08 15:37:23 UTC (4 days ago)
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problems with understand how to resize images properly

Thanks ...
Not quite sure what you mean ...

"So, start with the Work you want to resize, and create a new object with the desired size your trying to get. then copy one into the other."

Do you mean do the above In Gimp2? Then export to a jpg from gimp2?

Thanks

Gimp, you can have multiple images open.

what as explained to me, was Create a new image to the size you want open the image you want to resize.
drag the working image on to the Working picture then tell it too scale to it. Then Export it..

after its been exported, import the image into word. and it will be the size you need it too be.

when I copy from Gimp to word, a kind of magic happens, and it gets distorted.