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that typing business...

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that typing business... peter sikking 27 Apr 21:23
  that typing business... gg 27 Apr 22:38
  that typing business... Øyvind Kolås 28 Apr 07:24
   that typing business... Ragnar Brynjúlfsson 28 Apr 07:49
that typing business... Miles Bader 28 Apr 01:05
  that typing business... gg 28 Apr 05:15
  that typing business... Alexia Death 28 Apr 05:27
   that typing business... gfxuser 28 Apr 05:54
   that typing business... Liam R E Quin 28 Apr 06:15
   that typing business... Liam R E Quin 28 Apr 06:15
that typing business... Miles Bader 28 Apr 06:19
peter sikking
2012-04-27 21:23:52 UTC (about 2 years ago)

that typing business...

OK, I cannot resist quoting this review:

it uses GIMP to discuss ubuntus HUD. but then:

Of course GIMP is an app that lends itself to the mouse so switching to the keyboard to use the HUD isn't always faster.

if a software reviewer, with (I postulate) nowhere near the speed demands of our core users, can see the flaw, then...

yes, context is everything in interaction design,

--ps

founder + principal interaction architect man + machine interface works

http://blog.mmiworks.net: on interaction architecture

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gg
2012-04-27 22:38:05 UTC (about 2 years ago)

that typing business...

On 04/27/12 23:23, peter sikking wrote:

OK, I cannot resist quoting this review:

it uses GIMP to discuss ubuntus HUD. but then:

Of course GIMP is an app that lends itself to the mouse so switching to the keyboard to use the HUD isn't always faster.

if a software reviewer, with (I postulate) nowhere near the speed demands of our core users, can see the flaw, then...

yes, context is everything in interaction design,

--ps

founder + principal interaction architect man + machine interface works

http://blog.mmiworks.net: on interaction architecture

An interface that makes you drop your focus on the mouse pointer, look down at the keyboard and them back at a different part of the screen to see whether it has found a match ...

We called it heads up display because once you lowered your head(s) to look at the keyboard, you'll need to raise your _heads up_ again.

Clever , no ?

/gg

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Miles Bader
2012-04-28 01:05:57 UTC (about 2 years ago)

that typing business...

gg writes:

An interface that makes you drop your focus on the mouse pointer, look down at the keyboard and them back at a different part of the screen to see whether it has found a match ...

Wait, you look at the keyboard when you use it...?

-miles

gg
2012-04-28 05:15:02 UTC (about 2 years ago)

that typing business...

On 04/28/12 03:05, Miles Bader wrote:

gg writes:

An interface that makes you drop your focus on the mouse pointer, look down at the keyboard and them back at a different part of the screen to see whether it has found a match ...

Wait, you look at the keyboard when you use it...?

-miles

I'm quite capable of touch typing when dealing with text, that's what I'm doing now.

However, if I'm working with one hand on the mouse I'm likely to have the other hand at rest , not hovering over the keyboard either.

Now I could try stabbing around in the dark like a blind man and locate the keyboard by Braille. I reality I'm going to look down to see where it is and where the alt key is since that would be two orders of magnitude quicker.

Assuming the user is using a real mouse of graphics pad as pointing device HUD makes you break the flow to swap back and forth betweem mouse and keyboard.

This makes such an interface more of a down-up-down : DUD.

/gg

Alexia Death
2012-04-28 05:27:03 UTC (about 2 years ago)

that typing business...

On Sat, Apr 28, 2012 at 4:05 AM, Miles Bader wrote:

Wait, you look at the keyboard when you use it...?

Hell yes. It's not blind typing. In GIMP you very seldom get away with one key. It's all two-finger or 3 finger shortcuts. Even Ctrl-S can pose problems without looking if you have two laptops that have alternating Ctrl and Fn key positions. Plays havoc on muscle memory, that one.

gfxuser
2012-04-28 05:54:45 UTC (about 2 years ago)

that typing business...

> In GIMP you very seldom get away with one key.

Hi,

do you mean this needs to be improved?

Best regards,

grafxuser

Liam R E Quin
2012-04-28 06:15:21 UTC (about 2 years ago)

that typing business...

On Sat, 2012-04-28 at 08:27 +0300, Alexia Death wrote:

On Sat, Apr 28, 2012 at 4:05 AM, Miles Bader wrote:

Wait, you look at the keyboard when you use it...?

Hell yes. It's not blind typing. In GIMP you very seldom get away with one key. It's all two-finger or 3 finger shortcuts. Even Ctrl-S can pose problems without looking if you have two laptops that have alternating Ctrl and Fn key positions. Plays havoc on muscle memory, that one.

Hmm, I generally don't look at the keyboard, even when switching between laptop and desktop, and generally work with one hand on the mouse and one on the keyboard.

I taught myself some of the key sequences to navigate menus too, e.g. alt-c c for curves, but then found they don't work in full screen mode; it'd be great if Alt brought up the menu bar in full screen mode.

Liam

Liam R E Quin
2012-04-28 06:15:38 UTC (about 2 years ago)

that typing business...

On Sat, 2012-04-28 at 08:27 +0300, Alexia Death wrote:

On Sat, Apr 28, 2012 at 4:05 AM, Miles Bader wrote:

Wait, you look at the keyboard when you use it...?

Hell yes. It's not blind typing. In GIMP you very seldom get away with one key. It's all two-finger or 3 finger shortcuts. Even Ctrl-S can pose problems without looking if you have two laptops that have alternating Ctrl and Fn key positions. Plays havoc on muscle memory, that one.

Hmm, I generally don't look at the keyboard, even when switching between laptop and desktop, and generally work with one hand on the mouse and one on the keyboard.

I taught myself some of the key sequences to navigate menus too, e.g. alt-c c for curves, but then found they don't work in full screen mode; it'd be great if Alt brought up the menu bar in full screen mode.

Liam

Liam Quin - XML Activity Lead, W3C, http://www.w3.org/People/Quin/
Pictures from old books: http://fromoldbooks.org/
Miles Bader
2012-04-28 06:19:51 UTC (about 2 years ago)

that typing business...

Alexia Death writes:

Wait, you look at the keyboard when you use it...?

Hell yes. It's not blind typing. In GIMP you very seldom get away with one key. It's all two-finger or 3 finger shortcuts. Even Ctrl-S can pose problems without looking if you have two laptops that have alternating Ctrl and Fn key positions. Plays havoc on muscle memory, that one.

Hmm, I'm guessing you're not an Emacs user... :]

-miles

Øyvind Kolås
2012-04-28 07:24:31 UTC (about 2 years ago)

that typing business...

On Fri, Apr 27, 2012 at 11:23 PM, peter sikking wrote:

OK, I cannot resist quoting this review:

it uses GIMP to discuss ubuntus HUD. but then:

Of course GIMP is an app that lends itself to the mouse so switching to the keyboard to use the HUD isn't always faster.

if a software reviewer, with (I postulate) nowhere near the speed demands of our core users, can see the flaw, then...

yes, context is everything in interaction design,

This is not to say that typing will be faster than hunting through the menus of GIMP to find grid, checkerboard or unsharp mask that are hidden deep in the menu-hierarchy of GIMP. Such a type-to search based system could also be made to adapt to the user and by default present the recently top N used filters/actions without needing to type - kind of an "invoke recent action" that gives you a list of recently performed actions and allows you to pick one with the pointing device. Personally I use

/.

The future is already here. It's just not very evenly distributed
                        -- William Gibson
http://pippin.gimp.org/              http://ffii.org/
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Ragnar Brynjúlfsson
2012-04-28 07:49:05 UTC (about 2 years ago)

that typing business...

I tend to use Gimp with easystroke gestures when drawing. I did a tutorial on it a while back, which can be found here. http://www.gimptalk.com/index.php?/topic/36788-tutorial-using-gimp-with-gestures-look-ma-no-keyboard/ It's a bit out of date, but easystroke still works like a charm. I've switched out xvkbd with CellWriter, which has both hand writing recognition and a virtual keyboard.

Gestures are about as fast as keyboard shortcuts, and I find I rarely use more than 10 or so. It's great when working with something like a TabletPC (where the keyboard is folded under the screen) or a CintiQ.

Having used Blender a bit, I do see the use of this kind of menu navigation. Often when I'm looking for a tool I have no idea where is, I'll just type part of the name and find it....sometimes even discovering new features in the process.

Ragnar

p.s. I'm a long time emacs user, that never looks at the keyboard. :)

On Sat, Apr 28, 2012 at 9:24 AM, yvind Kols wrote:

On Fri, Apr 27, 2012 at 11:23 PM, peter sikking wrote:

OK, I cannot resist quoting this review:

it uses GIMP to discuss ubuntus HUD. but then:

Of course GIMP is an app that lends itself to the mouse so switching to the keyboard to use the HUD isn't always faster.

if a software reviewer, with (I postulate) nowhere near the speed demands of our core users, can see the flaw, then...

yes, context is everything in interaction design,

This is not to say that typing will be faster than hunting through the menus of GIMP to find grid, checkerboard or unsharp mask that are hidden deep in the menu-hierarchy of GIMP. Such a type-to search based system could also be made to adapt to the user and by default present the recently top N used filters/actions without needing to type - kind of an "invoke recent action" that gives you a list of recently performed actions and allows you to pick one with the pointing device. Personally I use s just not very evenly distributed -- William Gibson http://pippin.gimp.org/ http://ffii.org/ _______________________________________________ gimp-developer-list mailing list
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